Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Submit
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 kstreett 240
2 Guest_9020487 110
3 Guest_9190926 105
4 GoldenKid 100
5 ahowell 95
6 KnowledgeBase 95
7 skbloom 80
8 Guest_98024861 70
9 Guest_9311297 70
10 Guest_9400529 70

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 1/17/2018

A TREE FELL ON MY ELECTRICAL RISER. HOW MUCH SHOULD IT COST TO REPAIR THAT.

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


1 Answer

0
Votes

You are in luck - here are links to several previous very similar questions with answers FYI:

http://answers.angieslist.com/how-cos...

http://answers.angieslist.com/Riser-t...

http://answers.angieslist.com/when-re...

http://answers.angieslist.com/Is-eler...

http://answers.angieslist.com/Wooden-...

Might run as little as as a few hundred $ to refasten or replace the riser, plus whatever the power company charges for the reconnection. That is commonly a couple hundred range but some utilities grasping for $ or with powerful unions charge $500 or more. Usually the service wire disconnection/connection is free if caused by a tree falling on the line coming to the huse because that is "their" responsibility in most areas - and they might even cut (but not usually remove) the tree as part of that. But not repair the riser/westherhead. That cost range would be if the splices just tore apart at the weatherhead, or the mast tilted over but did not pull hard on the wires, or the tree is leaning on the riser/wires but did not really damage them.

At the other extreme would be total destruction and the wires were pulled hard enough they were damaged inside the riser or ripped the guts out of the meter then can be into the $500-1000 ballpark for a single residence meter box and riser - again plus the utility disconnect/connection charge (unless utility lets your electrician make that connection - very rare except in some quite remote areas where it takes hours to get a lineman out to do it. Cooperative power companies also rarely allow service line connection to the riser drop by a licensed journeyman electrician - not that all them want to or are willing to do that.

Answered 10 months ago by LCD




Related Questions


Terms Of Use
|
Privacy Policy