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Question DetailsAsked on 4/3/2014

CEMENT STEPS VERSES WOOD STEPS I LIVE WHERE WE HAVE A SMALL AMOUNT OF RAIN AND SNOW

I AM REPLACING MY CEMENT STEPS WHICH HAVE SWELLED UP AND PUSHED THE STEAL AWAY FROM THE CEMENT SO I WAS WONDERING SHOULD I DO WOOD INSTEAD

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2 Answers

0
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Please forgive my Ignorance ,But I am NOT certain that I understand your Question .

What do you mean , when you state that Your cement steps have swollen and pushed the Steal away from the cement ?


I assume that YOU are meaning to Say , STEEL , but I do not understand the statement pushed the STEEL away from the cement ?

I have tried to picture this problem in my mind , and just am having REAL trouble getting a mental picture of the problem in my mind .

Can You Please Restate this , or word it differently so I can grasp that of which you speak ?

Answered 5 years ago by BentheBuilder

0
Votes

Sounds like you mean freeze-thaw damage, where the surface of the concrete is delaminating and spalling - can also happen if not cured correctly when first placed. If not dramatic your cheapest fix will be removing railings and such, getting the concrete bush hammered to remove all loose or cracked materials, then patching with modified patching grout or an epoxy patch (better but more expensive). Then replace mounting bolts as needed, and reinstall railings. (Best time to derust/paint railings while off, too).


If you have already removed concrete or is pretty well shot, with cracking through the main body rather than just corners and flat surfaces, then wood is almost certain to be cheaper in most but not all parts of the country. If done with copper treated timber (the green treated wood) can last as long as concrete in a freeze-thaw or ice melt environment and less slippery usually, and of course cheaper to repair pieces if needed. Can be stained darker or painted. Can also use cedar or redwood or one of the very dense exotic woods that last a lot longer, or "composite" decking - i.e. plastics.

Answered 5 years ago by LCD




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