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Question DetailsAsked on 7/16/2014

Can I fill a sunken room

I have nothing but concrete floor and about 11inches around the floor wall up to drywall can I work concrete directly into it

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5 Answers

0
Votes

I am not totally clear on your situation. If you have concrete floor and concrete or concrete block walls, then yes - assuming you take care of floor ddrains, sump pump sump, sewer cleanouts, cleanouts for subfloor drains if you have them, etc


If you meant concrete slab but interior walls go right down to them, then no - you do not want to incorporate wood or drywall in your slab or have it extending below the slab level around the perimeter.


Be sure to watch your headroom - it is very rare that you have enough headroom to be able to pour a new slab in a basement or sunken room.


You also need to consider whether you need a slab waterproofing barrier under the new slab (which means it will be a floating probably 4 inch minimum thickness reinforced slab), or if you are going to bush hammer the existing slab and then bond the new slab to it.

Answered 4 years ago by LCD

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Votes

The way you posted this question is a bit vague.

If you have 11" from where you want finished grade I would probably recomend cutting treated plywood to the botttom of the drywall or a level point. I would then put 6 mill poly as a bond breaker between the existing slab and the new foor or possibly putting a sandy fill of about half the differential and the rest concrete. You want a bond breaker between the old concete and new as well as the walls. If what you are saying is the drywall would be below the new concrete you should use the poly as a bond breaker between the drywall and the concrete. It is not a perfect way to form the sides but should work, I would probably add a strip ot wolmanized plywood as a screed point over the drywall if that goes down below the point of the new floor level to make leveling the floor easier on the walls as this is where you will see any dips when the baseboard for the new floor will be.


Don

Answered 4 years ago by ContractorDon

0
Votes

I have a sunken living room which has the four walls are cement up to about 11 inches around the sunken they poured like the rest of the house and they sunk the living room I'm asking can I fill the sunken part in and not worry about anything will that work I would like to get the front room the same level as the dining and entryway

Answered 4 years ago by Happyjoy

0
Votes

That seems like a weird number 11" but okay we can go with that. Normal steps are in increments of 8". You are saying it is concrete or block for the 11". I would still probably put 5" to 6" of gravel or sandy fill in and put a bond breaker or expansion joint against the walls. The expasion joint will serve to purposes, as a point to level to and as an expansion joint and the fill will save you money on the price of concrete, You could use concrete as fill but it is moer expensive.


Don

Answered 4 years ago by ContractorDon

0
Votes

I would be sure they use fiber-reinforced bitumastic joint sealer around the perimeter - you can get in rolls or strips that are about 1/2" thick by 3" wide, peel and stick to the existing concrete about 1/2 inch below the final slab surface, a temporary removeable gap keeper or "zipper strip" put in the top 1/2 inch, then the new concrete is poured right up against it - will stop minor water inflows along the joint, and stop water vapor coming up there.





Then, after concrete has cured for a month or so and most of the shrinkage is done, caulk the remaining 1/2" depth of joint with concrete caulk to keep dirt out, eliminate that as a spider home, and seal off the minor but unpleasant smell of the bitumastic seal.

Answered 4 years ago by LCD




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