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Question DetailsAsked on 2/26/2017

Can a water softner be installed in conjunction with a water conditioner?

I currently have a Pelican water conditioner and would like to also install a water softener.

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2 Answers

0
Votes

Ahhh - looks like another person finds out that the claims from water conditioner companies are not all they are cracked up to be.
Certainly you can use both - a water softener is a type of water conditioner, which is a generic term for any device or process that modifies the incoming water to make it more acceptable or functional in some way. Water softeners typically use ion exchange or ion absorption (or both) to remove calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium (primarily) from the water to reduce "hardness", scale, soap scumming and high soap use, etc, and typically are installed so they treat all the household water, though at least in new construction (and sometimes in retrofits, depending on plumbing configuration) the outdoor hose bibs are usually tapped off the incoming line ahead of the waer softener so you don't waste money softening yard use water. Ditto to pools usually (but not always in really bad water areas - some even have their own water softening units).
Units like most Pelican products are basically a filtration product, which does limited or no removal or neutralization of water hardness as you evidently found out. You would want to contact Pelican about whether the slight added salt or resin agents (whichever type you choose) in the water would hurt their unit's filter elements - probably not, I would hope. To minimize blockages and buildup in the Pelican unit and reduce filter change costs, you would want to install the water softener "ahead of" the Pelican unit (so the water flows through the water softener first, then the cleaned up water flows through the filtration unit). Another consideration - do you want to reduce filter costs by limiting the Pelican filtration to only maybe the kitchen sink or maybe a few other drinking uses like reefer water dispenser/ice maker, coffee maker, etc ? It is possible to (sometimes with a bit of repiping) install it so it only processes say the cold water to the kitchen - so you are not processing flushing and shower and clothes washing and such water. Commonly that sort of installation (though if you have a whole house unit it probably will not fit there) is put under the kitchen sink. Obviously, Water Softeners (and many Plumbers ifgoing with a bought rather than a leased unit) would be your Search the List category to find a well-rated and reviewed provider for this.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD

0
Votes

Sorry - looks like the Angies List computer is taking out paragraph breaks again - but I think is is readable despite that - I tried to break up into paragraphs at the "nnn" lines - will see if that comes through as new paragraphs.

nnn
nnn

Ahhh - looks like another person finds out that the claims from water conditioner companies are not all they are cracked up to be.

nnn
nnn


Certainly you can use both - a water softener is a type of water conditioner, which is a generic term for any device or process that modifies the incoming water to make it more acceptable or functional in some way. Water softeners typically use ion exchange or ion absorption (or both) to remove calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium (primarily) from the water to reduce "hardness", scale, soap scumming and high soap use, etc, and typically are installed so they treat all the household water, though at least in new construction (and sometimes in retrofits, depending on plumbing configuration) the outdoor hose bibs are usually tapped off the incoming line ahead of the waer softener so you don't waste money softening yard use water. Ditto to pools usually (but not always in really bad water areas - some even have their own water softening units).

nnn
nnn


Units like most Pelican products are basically a filtration product, which does limited or no removal or neutralization of water hardness as you evidently found out.

nnn
nnn

You would want to contact Pelican about whether the slight added salt or resin agents (whichever type you choose) in the water would hurt their unit's filter elements - probably not, I would hope. To minimize blockages and buildup in the Pelican unit and reduce filter change costs, you would want to install the water softener "ahead of" the Pelican unit (so the water flows through the water softener first, then the cleaned up water flows through the filtration unit).

nnn
nnn


Another consideration - do you want to reduce filter costs by limiting the Pelican filtration to only maybe the kitchen sink or maybe a few other drinking uses like reefer water dispenser/ice maker, coffee maker, etc ? It is possible to (sometimes with a bit of repiping) install it so it only processes say the cold water to the kitchen - so you are not processing flushing and shower and clothes washing and such water. Commonly that sort of installation (though if you have a whole house unit it probably will not fit there) is put under the kitchen sink.

nnn
nnn


Obviously, Water Softeners (and many Plumbers ifgoing with a bought rather than a leased unit) would be your Search the List category to find a well-rated and reviewed provider for this.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD




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