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Question DetailsAsked on 1/26/2015

Cost of installing patio outswing door replacing existing sliding patio doors

we installed real wood floors in the dining room. the wood has swelled and we can hardly open the slider doors. I want to replace the sliders with a patio glass door with blinds inside. I only need one door to open.

Do you have any idea the cost of labor to reframe the door for these new doors? Maybe just a ballpark figure...

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3 Answers

0
Votes

The blinds inside are nice, they do kick up

the costs up a bit, lots of options on the doors can varie the price, energy savings package, tempered glass, additional footlocks, colors, size.

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Answered 4 years ago by the new window man

0
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You can find a couple of links to similar questions with answers right below this answer - quite a few more in last couple of years in the Home > Windows and Doors (or is it Doors and Windows) link in Browse Projects, at lower left.


My recommendation on the between-pane blinds - don't do it. I have seen all too many cases where they jammed in a short time, and of course if a cord breaks or they jam you have to pay for an entirely new glazing unit - blinds and both panes of glass in their encapsulating frame - can be on order of $500-1000 per panel installed !


As for the stuck sliders - might be a lot cheaper to just fix them, it in good shape - direct exterior rain away from them with a small porch roof, fix the water situation at the sill to keep the water away from the door (or to drain down outside of door and wall), caulk under the sill to prevent frost and moisture buildup during cold weather. Or the problem might be a sagging aged header which can sometimes be fixed with an outer frame and header to take the rafter load, or sometimes even by just adjusting the bottom track (which is commonly adjustable).You can find a couple of links to similar questions with answers right below this answer - quite a few more in last couple of years in the Home > Windows and Doors (or is it Doors and Windows) link in Browse Projects, at lower left.

Answered 4 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

BTW - when you said replace with patio glass door, I presume you meant french door with one fixed and one opening unit.


Bear in mind, an old axiom in the trade is that it is not a question of "if" french doors will leak, but "when" - so you are probably going to need an overhanging porch roof or awning or something to keep the water away from the door regardless of what type you use - certainly for pretty much any type except conventional entry door with full rain drip cap and lip and steeply sloped threshold with positive bottom seal, and even they commonly leak eventually.

Answered 4 years ago by LCD




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