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Question DetailsAsked on 6/10/2018

Do I need a mechanical permit to replace only the outdoor unit on a split system heat pump in MD?

My home warranty company will only replace the outdoor unit on my split system heat pump. They replaced they indoor unit/air handler 4 years ago. The contractor says I do not need a MD mechanical permit or inspection since they are not replacing the entire system. I just want to make sure this is true.

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3 Answers

0
Votes

Other than for hazardous facilities (gas stations, chemical plants, hazardous materials production or distribution facilities for example), and in California and New York which go permit crazy and sometimes require both state and local permits for work (though usually only for new construction), generally states handle general statewide building and safety code adoption of international or national building codes and updates (with local communities being able to do some local amendments), and also handle the licensing of construction and professional trades and workers.


The local counties and cities (generally, city or town building code controls if in a city within a county, though sometimes both fight with or overlay thjeir codes on each other - especially in older and rural states), and the local building code enforcement agencies handle the Planning and Zoning and Building work permits - so contact your local (town or county) building code enforcement number about the permit requirements for your heat pump unit replacement in your area.


Generally - though you are in one of the states with wildly varying code requirements and extents of enforcement - just replacement of an A/C unit without changing pressure tubing routing does not require a mechanical permit or inspection. Anything involving running new interior tubing or opening up the ducting (Ilike to replace an evaporator coil) or to install new interior air handler or furnace or such usually DOES require a permit and inspection, so what you vendor says sounds likely to me - but check with local code enforcement because yeah, you guessed it - failure to get a permit may get him in trouble but YOU, as the homeowner, pay and fines or doubled/tripled permit fees if not obtained in a timely (pre-work) fashion.


And unless this is a fairly old unit (say ovber 15 years and certainly over 10 years minimum) you might consider, come replacement time when not under warranty (or if your warrnty plan only covers a one-time replacement as many do) you might consided a better brandname unit - heat pumps themselves (as oppesed to coils which these days for heat pumps and A/C's generally are designed cheap so get a short life of probably about 10- years on the average) should generally last 15-20 years in all but most severe service, assuming annual checking, cleaning, and filter replacements are done.

Answered 5 months ago by LCD

0
Votes

Other than for hazardous facilities (gas stations, chemical plants, hazardous materials production or distribution facilities for example), and in California and New York which go permit crazy and sometimes require both state and local permits for work (though usually only for new construction), generally states handle general statewide building and safety code adoption of international or national building codes and updates (with local communities being able to do some local amendments), and also handle the licensing of construction and professional trades and workers.


The local counties and cities (generally, city or town building code controls if in a city within a county, though sometimes both fight with or overlay thjeir codes on each other - especially in older and rural states), and the local building code enforcement agencies handle the Planning and Zoning and Building work permits - so contact your local (town or county) building code enforcement number about the permit requirements for your heat pump unit replacement in your area.


Generally - though you are in one of the states with wildly varying code requirements and extents of enforcement - just replacement of an A/C unit without changing pressure tubing routing does not require a mechanical permit or inspection. Anything involving running new interior tubing or opening up the ducting (Ilike to replace an evaporator coil) or to install new interior air handler or furnace or such usually DOES require a permit and inspection, so what you vendor says sounds likely to me - but check with local code enforcement because yeah, you guessed it - failure to get a permit may get him in trouble but YOU, as the homeowner, pay and fines or doubled/tripled permit fees if not obtained in a timely (pre-work) fashion.


And unless this is a fairly old unit (say ovber 15 years and certainly over 10 years minimum) you might consider, come replacement time when not under warranty (or if your warrnty plan only covers a one-time replacement as many do) you might consided a better brandname unit - heat pumps themselves (as oppesed to coils which these days for heat pumps and A/C's generally are designed cheap so get a short life of probably about 10- years on the average) should generally last 15-20 years in all but most severe service, assuming annual checking, cleaning, and filter replacements are done.


Though there are some owners (particulrly if not planning on staying in the house indefinitely) who are happy to put in a cheap Goodman or off-brand for $2000-3000 every 4-5 years and figure the lower up-front costs (especially if having to finance it) is worth paying more frerquently rather than paying a much higher up-front cost for a longer-life unit.


t is an individual decision and heavily affected by your availability of and cost of the up-front money to install/replace the unit. Much like the decision between buying a brand new model car with lifetime warranty and holding it for at least a decade or two, or paying way less for a used car which might or might not do well for you, and in some cases may only last a year or few - but at potentially a reduction of up-front cost of as much as usually at least 50-70% and sometimes 90% or more. A lot of the decision can come down to your tolerance for less reliability/dependability and the risks of an unwarrantied failure soon after your investment.

Answered 5 months ago by LCD

0
Votes

Other than for hazardous facilities (gas stations, chemical plants, hazardous materials production or distribution facilities for example), and in California and New York which go permit crazy and sometimes require both state and local permits for work (though usually only for new construction), generally states handle general statewide building and safety code adoption of international or national building codes and updates (with local communities being able to do some local amendments), and also handle the licensing of construction and professional trades and workers.


The local counties and cities (generally, city or town building code controls if in a city within a county, though sometimes both fight with or overlay thjeir codes on each other - especially in older and rural states), and the local building code enforcement agencies handle the Planning and Zoning and Building work permits - so contact your local (town or county) building code enforcement number about the permit requirements for your heat pump unit replacement in your area.


Generally - though you are in one of the states with wildly varying code requirements and extents of enforcement - just replacement of an A/C unit without changing pressure tubing routing does not require a mechanical permit or inspection. Anything involving running new interior tubing or opening up the ducting (Ilike to replace an evaporator coil) or to install new interior air handler or furnace or such usually DOES require a permit and inspection, so what you vendor says sounds likely to me - but check with local code enforcement because yeah, you guessed it - failure to get a permit may get him in trouble but YOU, as the homeowner, pay and fines or doubled/tripled permit fees if not obtained in a timely (pre-work) fashion.


And unless this is a fairly old unit (say ovber 15 years and certainly over 10 years minimum) you might consider, come replacement time when not under warranty (or if your warrnty plan only covers a one-time replacement as many do) you might consided a better brandname unit - heat pumps themselves (as oppesed to coils which these days for heat pumps and A/C's generally are designed cheap so get a short life of probably about 10- years on the average) should generally last 15-20 years in all but most severe service, assuming annual checking, cleaning, and filter replacements are done.


Though there are some owners (particulrly if not planning on staying in the house indefinitely) who are happy to put in a cheap Goodman or off-brand for $2000-3000 every 4-5 years and figure the lower up-front costs (especially if having to finance it) is worth paying more frerquently rather than paying a much higher up-front cost for a longer-life unit.


t is an individual decision and heavily affected by your availability of and cost of the up-front money to install/replace the unit. Much like the decision between buying a brand new model car with lifetime warranty and holding it for at least a decade or two, or paying way less for a used car which might or might not do well for you, and in some cases may only last a year or few - but at potentially a reduction of up-front cost of as much as usually at least 50-70% and sometimes 90% or more. A lot of the decision can come down to your tolerance for less reliability/dependability and the risks of an unwarrantied failure soon after your investment.

Answered 5 months ago by LCD




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