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Question DetailsAsked on 5/7/2011

Don't most stores have good return policies these days?

My husband bought a pair of khakis last weekend at Banana Republic, and I laundered them yesterday. The bottom of the hem frayed though they were done on the permanent press cycles, both wash and dry in warm water. He tried to return them to the store today and they refused to take them on two counts. First, they said the hems are supposed to look frayed because it's 'the look.' Yeah, if you're under twenty one! I can't remember when a reputable store wouldn't take back an item.

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10 Answers

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That is absurd. When you buy an article of clothing you have a certain expectation that it will perform as expected, i.e., not fall apart when it's first washed. I hope you write to the manager of the district office or someone higher up and manage to get your money back. Clothes are supposed to fall apart on the first wash? I think not. Let us know if you get satisfaction from the higher ups.

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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I agree. Even if the hems were frayed when you purchased them they should give you your money back or at least a store credit if they want to keep you as a customer. Unfortunately when companies get too big they aren't as willing to keep the customers satisfied.

Answered 7 years ago by KAT7

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Well, I e-mailed customer relations at the home office re: the khakis with "the look". They answered with the usual "we regret" form letter. Included were further instructions to call an 888 number after which I should choose option 5, 2 and lastly 4. My husband is going to keep the pants and just use them for golf and I'm not going to waste my time pursuing this. He originally bought the khakis and five shirts. It won't ever happen again. Bye, bye Banana Republic.

Answered 7 years ago by michelemabelle

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Sorry Michele, I'm kinda giggling about you dealing with your husband's trendy purchasing oops.

Banana Republic quality was only so-so when it entered the marketplace 40 years ago. Me thinks the only way consumers can make a difference is to avoid trendy franchises.

Sadly Levi's quality control quickly spiraled down when they began outsourcing.... I have a pair circa 1960, unfortunately my body grew [;)]

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

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If I hadn't been so irritated with my husband for shopping at Banana Republic, I would have giggled too. Personally, I think the quality of their clothing certainly doesn't match their prices. Usually I buy him the $19.99 on sale, well-fitting, 100% cotton St. John's Bay pants from JC Penney. They come in all the basic colors and I've NEVER had a laundry problem as long as I wash the dark pants wrong-side-out.

Answered 7 years ago by michelemabelle

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Usually I buy him the $19.99 on sale, well-fitting, 100% cotton St. John's Bay pants from JC Penney. They come in all the basic colors and I've NEVER had a laundry problem as long as I wash the dark pants wrong-side-out."

It's hard to beat Penney's clothes for men, isn't it? Of course they're all made in third-world countires, but so are most of our clothes.

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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Yep, but there's very little made in the good old USA. I checked the label on the mystical Banana Republic pants and they were made in Thailand. The St. John's Bay, just for trivia's sake, are made in Mexico.

Answered 7 years ago by michelemabelle

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Sadly consumers rarely get what they presume it's what they paid for. how many take time to read lables?

With all the made in the USA and imported recalls, our mountimg trade deficit, how best to combat shoddy goods and questionable foods?

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

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"how best to combat shoddy goods and questionable foods?"

By being an intelligent consumer. Eat organic whenever possible. In regard to clothes and other goods, I consider my job as a consumer to be to find the best product at the lowest price. Sometimes that means shopping at Walmart (gasp), although that's not my most pleasant shopping experience. A lot of times it means ordering products online and paying more for them than I would locally. It certainly means reading labels every time and considering what I need and what I really don't need at all.

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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I bought a shirt at Gander Mountain and didn't actually notice the frayed seams on the back and arms because they were ironed down so well. After I washed it, the shirt looked like a rag--partly because the body really didn't have any shape, either. They took it back (big frown on clerk's face).

Back in the Dark Ages, when Banana Republic started, they had a catalogue and really interesting things that they really used around the world on various trips--like the dress that you could wash in the sink after sight seeing in heat and dust during the day and wear out to dinner the next night in case just a shake out didn't do enough.

Docker khakis at J. C. Penney store or online are a great buy.

Answered 7 years ago by keikosmom




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