Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Submit
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 kstreett 240
2 Guest_9020487 110
3 Guest_9190926 105
4 GoldenKid 100
5 ahowell 95
6 KnowledgeBase 95
7 skbloom 80
8 Guest_98024861 70
9 Guest_9311297 70
10 Guest_9400529 70

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 6/10/2011

Greenboard application around shower

I am having my basement finished and a bathroom installed with a shower. The contractor did the shower walls with Hardie-backer board and the ceiling with greenboard. Around the sides and bottom of the opening where there will be tile and then the shower door installed, he used more greenboard. Is this the proper way to do this?

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


6 Answers

0
Votes

I hope somebody knowledgeable about this type of work replies. It sounds like it's being done right to me, but then again I'm not very knowledgeable about this type of work. I would like to know more about this.

Answered 7 years ago by nakikita

0
Votes

I read your question and yes they did it right. The backerboard is a cement board and is used to cement the tile to the wall. If they would cement the tile to drywall in a shower area, it would come lose and destroy the drywall. The greenboard is made to resist water and steam better than regular drywall along with a good coat of primer and paint.

Answered 7 years ago by Roger Hilliard

1
Vote

First of all, I am not a contractor and certainly not an expert on tiling or bathrooms. I did research waaaay too much before doing my own bathroom last year. I can share some of that with you and, more importantly, recommend a trip over to John Brigde's tile forums, one of the most helpful message boards I have come across in the last ten years.

Your contractor did a better job than most, but not as good as he should or could have done. If you do a search on green board, you will see that many building codes no longer accept it in wet or high moisture locations. The second moisture touches the paper, the board will start to crumble. On the walls of a daily used shower, that's pretty much guaranteed to happen sooner than later. Yet many contractors still use it because it is cheaper, much quicker to install, and that's way they have always done it.

So your contractor used a cement backerboard on the walls of the shower--where it needed to be installed the most. Hopefully he followed the instructions, including using an alkali-resistant glass fiber tape (rather than the normal fiberglass mesh used on gypsum wallboards).

A very good contractor will extend the Hardiebacker out past the shower opening at least a few inches. This keeps the seam between the regular and the cement wallboards away from moisture and is extra insurance for open shower doors.

Depending on how good the ventilation in the bathroom and the general humidity in the house, a few contractors will also put something more water resistant than greenboard on the ceiling. For my own bathroom ceiling, I didn't use cement board, but I did use a water resistant paperless wallboard.This was after I notices about half the bathroom ceilings in houses built in the last 10 to 15 years are already crumbling around the fan or light (where moisture could get to the paper).

So in summary, specify higher requirement in the next remodel (and be willing to pay more), and just keep the fan on longer and the water off the walls of your present bathroom.


Answered 7 years ago by optimist

0
Votes

[quote user="Roger Hilliard"]I read your question and yes they did it right. The backerboard is a cement board and is used to cement the tile to the wall. If they would cement the tile to drywall in a shower area, it would come lose and destroy the drywall. The greenboard is made to resist water and steam better than regular drywall along with a good coat of primer and paint.[/quote]

Correctly said; I very much agree!

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------

- My bathroom has Engineered wood floor from Hosking - Will C

Answered 7 years ago by Will C

0
Votes

Green board is used around washers and sink areas. Any professional would always install hardi backer or cement board in tub and shower areas. In New Mexico the building inspectors would not allow it. Most contractors never learned the correct methods for waterproofing and will never take the time to do it right. You can go online to the Tile Counsel of North America to see the proper procedures for shower installations, and other information such as certified tile installers. You will be surprised on how few certified installers there are.

Answered 7 years ago by KP

0
Votes

I live in Austin TX where the new code rules state all wet areas(showers and tub surrrounds) must use cement board. The ceiling is where all the moisture rises to, so to skimp on one of the most moisture-prone areas is ridiculous and I do not think would pass code. Did the installer caulk all seams and screw holes? Whenever I do a tile install, we use an additional waterproofing material over the entire surface. If a customer asks us not to do this because of cost(about $3.00 square foot installed-80 s.f. shower is $240.00) I will not do the job. Greenboard wicks water just as fast as sheetrock once it is exposed to moisture and has been banned in our town for wet areas. You should NEVER go with the cheapest bid!

Jack@Capital Marble & Tile

Answered 7 years ago by yodabear1990




Related Questions


Terms Of Use
|
Privacy Policy