Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Submit
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 kstreett 240
2 Guest_9020487 110
3 Guest_9190926 105
4 GoldenKid 100
5 ahowell 95
6 KnowledgeBase 95
7 skbloom 80
8 Guest_98024861 70
9 Guest_9311297 70
10 Guest_9400529 70

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 12/8/2017

aje
How much should I expect to pay for a gorilla garage floor?2 car garage about 400sq ft

assuming concrete is in excellent shape and does not need any repair.

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


1 Answer

0
Votes

I think the question is not what a "Gorilla garage floor" (presuming here you are probably talking My Gorilla" brand, but makesnot diff the exat brand) shoudl cost, but what a good floor coating should cost. Do not let yurself grossly overpay for a specific brandname or "fad" franchise product which may be grossly overpriced- not saying that about Gorilla (which I have never heard of, but just in general.


Generally speaking, "paints" generally run under $2/SF, but do wear off with traffic and cannot tolerate long-term water soaking into them.


Epoxy, the next most resistant coating, commonly $3-7/SF - wear well but will eventually wear out, and discolors in sunlight exposure.


Polyurea and polyaspartic coating (variations on the same chemistry, polyaspartic generally felt to be a bitmore resistant to damage and wear) typically around $5-10/SF - generally around $7/SF plus orminus a buck or so.


These are all with standard prep for the finish type (cost range commonly largely a function of need or no need for removal of existing finishes at commonly about $1-2/SF), but no significant crack repair and no repair of vertically offset or large cracks or of garage floor slope issues.


Bear in mind in reading articles on what a job cost in garage / shop blogs, not only are variations in concrete repair and removal of prior coatings going to affect the total cost (and therefore the calculated cost per SF), but many people run the coating at least up the concrete stemwall of the footings and sometimes a foot to three up the wall, so figured on the basis of garage floor area that can of course sharply bias the cost upwards - for instance can increase the per SF cost calculated on the basis of floor area only into the $10/SF or even high range. I saw one garage where the reported cost was over $25/SF - but turned out that was for coverage of the entire floor and all the way up the walls to the ceiling with polyaspartic coating. The non-slip coating used can also affect the cost quite a bit - from no added cost for simple translucent silica traction additives to a couple of dollars per SF for some fancy colored decorative pattern embedded rather than top scatter products.


My recommendation - consider the reputation of both the brand name of the finish (whether or not proprietary to the vendor like with ArmourCoat and rhino and such, or made by a finish manufacturer like DuPont), AND the reputation of the provider - because a good applicator cannot do a good long-life job with cheap product, but commonly a "blow-and-go" or inexperienced provider can make of mess of even the best ICF or Sika or DuPont products, for instance, making mess of your $100+ to as much as $400/gallon material.


BTW - while many home-handy people do acceptable to even quite good looking DIY jobs with paints and epoxies, I would NOT recommend trying polyurea or polyaspartic coatings yourself - not only because the skill level to do it well is higher, but they can be very time-sensitive (especially with respect to when the traction or decorative coating is applied) but you are also dealing with product generally costing hundreds of dollars a gallon, so you have a lot more of the job at risk out-of-pocket if you mess it up. Also much harder and more expensive to remove a botched job to redo it, if needed.

Answered 11 months ago by LCD




Related Questions


Terms Of Use
|
Privacy Policy