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Question DetailsAsked on 8/30/2012

How do I get rid of mice in an old house, and odor of mouse urine?

Noticed a funky smell in kitchen weeks ago; it seemed to come and go. A man familiar w/ mice/ rats pulled out the fridge drain pan and said the odor was mouse urine; also found droppings. I'm horrified! House cat hasn't caught any mice, not that I want a dead one brought to me. Mouse/rat block poison is under the house,but hasn't eliminated them; now odor has spread to dining room; am afraid it may be in wood floors. How small a hole can mice get through? Do I have to set old-fashioned traps, or what?

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15 Answers

Voted Best Answer
13
Votes

You have a lot of questions. I will try to cover them all.

First, mice can fit through a hole the size of a dime.
Second, unlike rats, mice are very small; it would take a major infestation to generate a persistent odor as indicated.

Elimination starts by sealing the exterior foundation of the home, door sweeps, broken windows, cracks in the foundation, holes around electrical service, water faucets and dryer vents.

Secondly, food sources must be eliminated. Mice only need 1 gram of food a day and they extract water directly from the food they digest.

Next, mice infestations are more localized than people think, bait under the house might not have any effect. Heat sources like refrigerators and hot water heaters are suspect as a base of operation.

Snap traps are highly effective when used where dropping are found. Use a variety of bait, peanut butter (avoid this if children are present), brownie, fruit and even dental floss tied to the pedal (nesting material).

As for the odor, look for an enzyme based cleaner / deodorizer.

If the problem continues seek the help of a Pest Control Professional with rodent experience.

Hope that helps,

Andrew Deluca



Source: www.MagicExterminating.com

Answered 1 year ago by adeluca

0
Votes

I agree with Andrew, he gave an excellent answer!


The only thing I would add to his response is if you have a urin smell you may have a major infestation. Mice like many rodents carry disease risk and you may save money in the long run hiring a professional.


Doug Longfellow

NaturZone Pest Control


Source: http://www.naturzone.com

Answered 1 year ago by dlongfellow

1
Vote

You can eliminate odors by four methods, open windows and air out the rooms, odor eliminating sprays. An air ionizer or ozone generator introduces negative to negate odors. A permanent way to keep odors away and your home smelling fresh and clean is repainting the walls in a room and add the paint additive Air-ReNu, which only has to be applied once works 7/24/365.

Source: http://www.air-renu.com

Answered 1 year ago by vrvs

-11
Votes

Adopt another cat or two from your local animal shelter! Rodents instinctively avoid areas where cats live (they can smell the cats). Seriously, I wouldn't use traps. Your cat might be injured by one of those medieval devices. Also, your cat may be eating the mice already (in a house I used to own, one of my cats ate plenty of them. Love them little mousies; mousies what I love to eat; bite they little heads off; nibble on they tiny feet. Actually, she devoured them so quickly that all I saw was the tail disappearing like a piece of spaghetti.) Better to seal up all the holes, clean well, and fumigate.

Answered 1 year ago by Oleron

7
Votes

Actually, mice can get through a 1/4 " hole! See the Center for Disease Control's website for tips on cleanup of excreta, traps, mice and nests.


Cleanup of Rodent Urine and Droppings and Contaminated Surfaces

    During cleaning, wear rubber, latex, vinyl, or nitrile gloves. Spray rodent urine and droppings with a disinfectant or chlorine solution until thoroughly soaked. (See Cleanup of Dead Rodents and Rodent Nests.) To avoid generating potentially infectious aerosols, do not vacuum or sweep rodent urine, droppings, or contaminated surfaces until they have been disinfected. Use a paper towel to pick up the urine and droppings. Place the paper towel in the garbage. After the rodent droppings and urine have been removed, disinfect items that might have been contaminated by rodents or their urine and droppings. --- Mop floors with a disinfectant or chlorine solution.

Source: http://http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/previe...

Answered 1 year ago by roxles

-2
Votes

You can rent an Ozone generator, close the house up and let it run for a day or so. As long as the stinky little creatures are not still in the house you will be rid of the smell without paying a professional.
You could need one machine for each room.
This is the way farmers minimize the smell from pig farms so I know that it works...
As for getting rid of mice and other unwanted creatures: you just need to sprinkle some moth crystals where you will not be breathing the fumes.
You don't need to use many and you can keep the unused portion in a sealed jar for many years.
Personally I prefer using moth balls. I have had bumble bees in the yard and placed a moth ball in the hole that they had created. They came out
acting drunk and never returned.
This goes for dogs in your yard as well. You make a hole large enough for the mothball and place it in the hole where they like to mess your yard and they will stay away...

Answered 1 year ago by SirStephen

1
Vote

Good prior answers. Two additional thoughts - aside from keeping floors clean (no food scraps dropped by kids, etc), is it possible the catfood (anddogfood maybe ?) is attracting the mice, if you don't think the cat is getting them ?

You also need to carefully ferret out ANY outside opening within about 3 feet of ground level that they could get in, and block that off to prevent a reinfestation after you think you have solved the problem. This includes getting down on the floor and checking for places where there is visible daylight coming under doors (seal with door sweepers), under the garage/house door seal (use vinyl bulb seal), around pipes or wires coming into the house (foam sealer and caulk), and under the garage rollup door (bottom strip running full width, overlapped at ends with weatherstrip seal), etc.

Answered 11 months ago by LCD

1
Vote

Great Stuff expanding foam has a new product in green can for rodent holes or access points. I just used this to seal all access points I saw in the crawl space. Steel wool also is good for plugging holes, but I would use the Great Stuff in green can for insulating also. It is carried at Home Depot, but you have to search for it sometimes.

Answered 9 months ago by Guest_95794004

2
Votes

First of all, are you sure they're Mice and not Rats? The first thing we would do is find and remove whatever 'Poison Baits' were thrown under your home or anywhere inside it! That's where your odor problem came from - dead mice or rats rotting in your walls or attic spaces! There are obvious entry points in or around your home allowing dying (poisoned) rodents to enter in your walls or attic spaces!


At the very least we would perform a thorough inspection of not only the interiors of your home but also the exterior environs to determine any 'nesting' or 'entry' sources. Mice can enter through a dime-sized hole or gap in your eaves or through the plumbing vent pipes on your roof, A/C line chaseways or even gaps around windows and doorways. Areas we find we would advise you on corrective measures. Any 'Rodent Proofing' needed we can be performed by us.


So far as 'odor' is concerned we carry the enzymed based sprays and ULV misting whole area fogging products designed to destroy odor causing germs and bacteria.


Critter Control of Florida

Answered 8 months ago by GaryKasper

1
Vote

Peppermint oil. They hate it. Squirt bottle....spray around every possible entry...including under exterior doors, especially garage door(s) and the door from garage into house. Google it and there are many places to buy it. I just got some and I do not have any evidence of rodents...but I do this as insurance. I live in the desert (Tucson area) so many neighbors report having one now and then. One is 10 too many.

Answered 6 months ago by Guest_9783069

0
Votes

I tried everything, and still would get mice inside in the winter. I adopted a cat which my niece could no longer keep, and what a good mouser! In two years, she killed two mice, and I have never seen another one or any droppings.

Answered 5 months ago by Guest_95717255

1
Vote

What I thought was an interesting comment is that you said that you put bate under the house. My assumption is that you have a crawlspace, not a basement or a slab. Typical crawlspaces are very neglected areas and mice can enter in various and many small openings,especially just above the foundation at the sill plate and the sill boxes. Openings for AC lines, water spigots, etc. are often missed because people generally hate beong in there. We are often faced with the same problem, especially when fiberglass insulation is used as it is a favorite home for mice.

We are very successful at using steel wool in these small holes and then spraying closed cell foam insulation into these sill boxes. The crawlspace floor and foundation needs to be reviewed and sealed if necessary, which is also very recommended for numerous other reasons.

Source: www.APerfectCrawlspace.com

Answered 5 months ago by Guest_9806935

0
Votes

I was an orchardist for 13 years and what we used in the orchard was not the same as what we used in the house, I think most orchardists have a chronic mouse problem in their homes also. I found that old fashioned traps baited with cheese coated in peanut butter worked the very best of anything I tried, Granted the poison decon worked good but you just might find them dead inside your couch or favorite chair as happened in my case. It was the smell of decay that alerted me. Since this poison dehydraytes it's victoms they seek the nearest water source but unfortunately they die on the way to that water source. Poisoned oats were and are not for household use.


Source: Self

Answered 4 months ago by Guest_957031240

0
Votes

The only thing that I swear by for mice is professional glue traps, particularly Catchmaster professional glue traps (http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw=...)


Get those and put them where they usually travel through.


Eventually they will get smart and realize that these traps are killed their comrades. So you will have weeks where they wont go on them. So what you have to do is give them couple of weeks to lower their guards. Once the guard is down put the traps back on and wallah you have caught mice again. Its a continual process. :)

Answered 29 days ago by Guest_9792017

0
Votes

I have a cabin that we purchased that had similar issues. I'd recommend good old snap traps with peanut butter as well as the Tin Cat resetable-type trap with a glue strip and peanut butter. As far as getting rid of the odor, I'd start with bleach water and really wipe everything down until there is no visible dirt. Then go to Home Depot and buy a gallon concentrate of OdoBan. This stuff is amazing. It kills EVERYTHING, but yet is supposed safe to use... The smell can be a bit overpowering for a while, but it's not really a chemical smell. I would wait a day in between the bleach and Odoban though so you don't get a reaction. Anyway, I haven't had a wiff of mouse smell since I've used it.


(Info From Home Depot below)

Kills 99.99% of germs such as Streptococcus pyogenes (Strep), Escherichia coli 0157:H7 (E.coli)(pathogenic strain), Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (Staph) and Klebsiella pneumoniae on hard, nonporous, nonfood contact surfaces in 60 seconds

    Fungicidal against germs such as Trichophyton mentagrophyte (the athlete's foot fungus), when used on surfaces in areas such as locker rooms, dressing rooms, shower and bath areas and exercise facilitiesEffectively controls and inhibits the growth of mold and mildewKills HIV-1 (AIDS Virus), influenza A/Hong Kong and Herpes Simplex type 2 in 60 seconds



Source: http://www.homedepot.com/p/OdoBan-1-g...

Answered 9 days ago by Guest_91940244

0
Votes

Ditto for what has been said... AND there are new mouse traps that are so easy to use and reuseable if you want to. I so recommend them over the old snap traps... these break the necks very quickly..much more humane than catching a leg. The metal ones work ONCE... then the mice leave some sort of odor... and you could put the traps in 100's of mice and not catch one. snap-e mouse trap 6 pack
Snap-E Mouse Trap-6 Pack

Answered 4 days ago by Guest_9263805




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