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Question DetailsAsked on 9/20/2011

How do you eliminate morning glory vines without harming existing landscaping?

I have unwanted morning glory vines growing in my landscaping and want to know how I can eliminate the vines without harming the plants it has entwined itself around.

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2 Answers

1
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Morning glory is tough. It grows through rhizomes which makehand pulling quite a chore. I'm not sure how much you have or how vast thelandscaping is around it but here’s a few ways to kill it.

Remove its light source. It will take some time but it will die after a prolongperiod without light. Cut the tops off and use plastic to cover and kill the bottom.If you can cut off its water it would help as well.

Burn it! Don't go using a blow torch or anything, a simple lighter will do. Ihave heard through the years that if it’s burned it won't grow in the same spot- that doesn't mean it won't grow in another spot, so you would have to keepburning.

Broadleaf herbicide will have to be used repeated but should eventually kill theweed.

Note: If your neighbor also has the vine growing you will continue to get ituntil they handle it on their side.

This is a very aggressive weed and may require a combination of all of theabove. Because of drought please be careful when using a lighter. Never use thelighter or herbicide when it's windy as it can damage your existing landscape or worst.

Answered 7 years ago by Dallas Curb Appeal

0
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Sure-fire way - Roundup Poison Ivy Plus Tough Brush Killer - also works on bamboo and sumac and lilac and kudzu and berry bushes and such hardy plants. Several applications sprayed on the leaves may do it, or that may only kill the live growth and you will have to inject it to kill the roots. I have used a fine needle injector with good success - inject to center of stem several places, about 1/4-1 ml (as much as it will take except for bamboo which will take ounces if you let it) each place. If stem is too tough to push a needle into or you can't get an injector needle, drill or poke a 1/16-1/8" hole angled down into the stem and fill that up with killer using a small disposable syringe or old liquid medication drop dispenser. If small kids or licking pets around, put clear boxing tape around it to keep away from them - better around little kids than electrical or duct tape as being clear it does not attract kid's attention.


Then, any time a volunteer pops up out of the ground from the unkilled roots, inject that too - should be totally killed in about a month to two or growing season.


Obviously, where entwined around other plants then you are looking at the needle injection method.


If going the spray route, bear in mind that subsequent needle injection will only work in living plant - so if the spray kills only the above-ground growth, you will have to wait for it to put up volunteeer stalks to inject, so my advise is inject AND spray right off the bat.


(Only works if injected during growing season).

Answered 4 years ago by LCD




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