Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 LCD 8640
2 Member Services 5750
3 ContractorDon 1235
4 Jefferson 345
5 BayAreaAC 325
6 the new window man 275
7 Roofman1 190
8 SalisburySam 160
9 sooty 140
10 SmartEnergyToday 120

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 5/1/2011

How much should water heater installation cost?

How much should it cost to have a standard (tank) gas water heater installed? In 1995, I paid $150 to have one installed in Atlanta. I have read a few DIY boards where they say it should take a home owner 2 or 3 hours to do the job themselves, which I won't do, and that $300 is too much to pay for professional installation. However, the few plumbers & handymen companies I've called in the Chicago area are quoting me from $900 to $2500. They use water heaters that are difficult to price check because these you can't get places like Home Depot or Lowes. Doing some digging, I have found some information on them, and they cost between $200 and $300. Which means the installation charges are $600 to $2200 -- for something that should take less than 3 hours of work! Is it unreasonable for me to think it should cost the price of a water heater (plus markup, I suppose) and 3 hours of install time? 300 + 50 + 3*125 = $725 seems to be a reasonable maximum.

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


82 Answers

Voted Best Answer
51
Votes

You have to put your self in the shoes of a business that is in business to turn a profit of some sort. All businesses have different overhead which in turn decides what their bottom line would be on their services. I personally would not go with an unlicensed professional for this type of install. You are messing with gas, venting issues, electrical wiring{electric water heater} and updated code issues such as a drain pan and tempature and relief drain lines for heaters that currently do not have them. I do agree that there are some companies that are way out of line for their installs but most of these companies are the really big companies that have very high overheads I would assume. Tank type water heaters have changed over the last several years and with these safety changes come bigger prices. The price of steel thanks to China is skyrocketing and tank type water heaters are made of steel. Most wholesale plumbing supply companies cannot match what the big box stores are selling at retail to consumers. I happen to think from research that heaters such as Rheem, Bradford White and AOSmith who have been in business forever make a better product than what you can buy in the big box outlets. You also have to take in consideration the location of the water heater that is being replaced. Is it in the house, basement, garage or attic. Most 40 and 50 gallon water heaters that are purchased in a plumbing wholesale store in Texas cost between 300-340 for a 6 year warranty heater with 6 year on parts and tank. Speaking of warranty. Most big box companies will take a least 24 hours to a week to get your warranty problem taken care of. Most reputable plumbing companies will give same day service if they installed the heater.

So lets break down a typical install at cost to a licensed plumber in Texas

Heater: $315, water shut off $6.50, water flex lines or unions to code $20, gas flex line and cut off to code $12, misc fittings $15, Total $368.50 Lets add a 35% profit which is some what low for a business $129, Total 497.50

This doesnt include permits, pan and drain or any venting issues. The vent must go from the heater to the outside of roof using double wall vent.

Cost of permit on average $60

Most plumbing companies allow for 3 hours of time for a water heater. This includes picking the new one up. Delivering out to house. Draining and removing old water heater. Hauling off old heater. Installing new heater up to code. Going down to city and pulling permit.

Average Labor charges for heater installs $400

That would make this install run without extras on any code issues $957.50

I just had a 50 gallon gas water heater installed in my house for $1200 but I needed a pan installed. I used a licensed plumber.




Answered 3 years ago by codeman

3
Votes

imo, I would want a licensed/insured professional to install a GAS water heater in my home, working with gas is dangerous even for professionals. So when comparing prices, keep in mind who is licensed/insured , and who is not a professional. Usually the lower prices "too good to be true", are not licensed/insured, and these are the people you cannot compare with the licensed/insured professional.

As for Handymen companies, if they are not licensed to perform plumbing/gas work, they should not be in your home giving you an estimate.

As for Plumbers using products you cannot find, well that's usually something that can be explained easily. Why should a Plumber warranty a product that was made inferior by a "home store" or DIY store? Thats why plumbers use products from supply houses, they are better quality, and the contractor will warranty his own equipment. Try buying a water heater, and having it installed by a licensed pro. They will not warranty the heater, and if something goes wrong with it, you will be charged to fix/replace it even under a year.

AS for a price Gas water heater have now gone up, figure a 50 gallon i've heard installed in Ny for $980.00-$1180, but this only if for a true professional installation.

Answered 3 years ago by balboa

2
Votes

Typical cost here in the Philly area for a 40 gallon gas water heater installation is between $600-800. Don't forget that they also take away the old one in many cases and that can also be a hassle (and possibly an additional expense) if you had to handle it yourself.

Answered 3 years ago by Sherlock Homes

10
Votes

I just had a new 40 gallon gas water heater intsalled yesterday at my home in Kansas City. The plumber gave me an option of having him get the water heater at a price of $350 or said I could get one myself at Home Depot and he would pick it up and install it for me. I chose to purchase one from him, because he told me that his was a higher quality and would last longer (I think the brand he installed was "State"). Besides, when I looked the water heaters up at Home Depot they were not that much cheaper anyway and the plumber told me that there was even some sort of pending lawsuit against GE water heaters and I didn't want to get into that....

It took the plumber 2.5 hours to install it at a cost of $65 per hour--so my total cost for the heater and labor with tax was about $550.00. He also hauled away the old heater.

I know that things like this are usually much cheaper here in the midwest than in other places, but that may give someone an idea!

Hope that helps!

Answered 3 years ago by sophieollie

3
Votes

Sophie, what you paid sound very reasonable. You have the price of the heater, labor, replacement of some plumbing at the heater since it may be corroded and re-plumbing to fit the layout of the new heater's pipes, but the basic hook up is there to start with. Your plumber is not reinventing the wheel and barring the unforseen, max of 3 hours labor. Unhook old heater, remove from premises, new heater in, it's hookup, dispose of old heater - - not necessarily in that order.I would do it myself because it is not brain surgery but the HARD part is getting rid of the old one, which by the time it croaks weighs about eight times what it did new [massive lime buildup inside over the years]. Some of the above posters are really paying a lot unless there is something I can't see, like they live on the 10th floor with no freight elevator or bought a very expensive, large heater.

Answered 3 years ago by baw

0
Votes

[quote user="Sherlock Homes"]Typical cost here in the Philly area for a 40 gallon gas water heater installation is between $600-800. Don't forget that they also take away the old one in many cases and that can also be a hassle (and possibly an additional expense) if you had to handle it yourself.[/quote]

I live in Arizona and the overall cost is less but there is a lot more to than just the installation. You might be able to do it yourself but what will you do with the old one?

Answered 3 years ago by Your Fresh Start

2
Votes

Your 16-17 year old water heater is well beyond the typical life span here in the Philly area. Gas water heaters here typically last about 12 years (plus or minus 2). I have seen very very few 15+ year old water heaters still in operation, but not many.

I think what has been established on this thread is that the cost of replacement depends on your area of the country. The original poster was getting quotes in excess of $1000, while here around Philly $600-800 is the norm (I have had dozens of clients need this and seen several quotes in this range to verify it), while others in the midwest and elsewhere come in lower than that.

It is a very common task, and I would receommend you call a few plumbers for a ballpark estimate over the phone (many won't do this, but some will).

Answered 3 years ago by Sherlock Homes

0
Votes

It usually just depends on the time. As in how long it takes.

-----------------------------


Source: 

Answered 3 years ago by superstar3009

-6
Votes

Our water is so hard around here that even if we use a softener, water heater tanks fail in 10 years or so. Unfortunately I need to replace mine, but have to choose between hot water or paying for my insurance since losing my job last summer. Not a fun choice.

Pat J

Source: 

Answered 3 years ago by PatJewett

-3
Votes

I just had 3 replaced in a rental property at the same time. Each unit cost $208 from Home Depot. I had a handyman do the installation/removal for all three for $350 in labor. Grand total of $974. Hope that helps!

Source: 

Answered 2 years ago by hufster

0
Votes

Geez...I think we got taken. My husband purchased a water heater from Home Depot. He thought he and a friend could install it, but the job ended up being more involved. We had some people come install it. 2 hours later...we are almost $800 dollars poorer.

Answered 2 years ago by Kvaldetero

-3
Votes

I just had Home Depot put in a gas hot water heater. The cost of the water heater plus tax came to $580 (9 year GE) but the installer charged an additional $1000, yes, $1000 for installation. My house was built in 2003 and the Home Depot repairman said that I needed to be code compliant as well as add several carbon monoxide alarms. I don't understand how so many codes could have changed but he claimed changes almost occur weekly. All told, an additional $1000!!! Don't know if I really needed everything he said was required but did not feel I had much a choice.

Answered 2 years ago by scotth0531

0
Votes

YOU ARE CRAZY. we don't tell doctors how much they should charge for the 30 wait time in the office and the 10 minutes we get to see the for a shot or a wellness visit! Have you costed that ???? Normal mark up is about 30% on product. The going rate for a licensed plumber is 125 an hour. Have you tried to lift a water heater by yourself???? It is a 2 person job so that would be where the 750 for installation comes from.

SO, here is the reality check...
water heater is about 300-450 + 750 for a 2 person install=$1100.00 at least for a new water heater. That's not including if you have gas.


I don't understand why people watch HGTV which is misleading and think they know or assume what something should cost. I think plumbers know how much it cost to install a water heater.
My advice is call 3 and get estimates. Compare each and chose which one is best for you. OF course if you want to be cheap, you get what you pay for.

Answered 2 years ago by romiwilliams1

0
Votes

Well you are dealing with flat rate pricing the 50 gas cost around $500.00 and the hidden labor charge built in is about $450.00 per hour they usually give the tech 2hrs to install and they make $55.00 per plus the trip charge they get an half hour .,they tack on at the $39.00 trip rate and if they say they wave it, BS! its still built into the price and they will charge you for extras new shut off valve expansion tank permit and believe me get a permit if they wont get you one throw them out! so now you can compare but get a permit! Oh and some charge you to haul it away and for stairs etc! Have a nice day.

Answered 2 years ago by owen klaus

4
Votes

We just had one installed outside of Chicago...Paying for a good 50 gallon tank (w/a good warranty) w/installation & permits, costs just under $1100. I called 8 companies and the variance was under $50 among them all...I ended up having Home Depot install it...If you buy the one that lasts the longest from them, they'll warranty it to you for as long as you own your home...


Answered 2 years ago by jlknaus

2
Votes

I live n the Philly area I brought my tank n supplies had a licensed plumber come take out the old 1 put n the new 1 n 2hrs for $250.00... He took the old 1 with him when he left and all I had was alil clean up!! I feel like u all got robbed! Shop around!! Family owned businesses usually do gr8 work for much cheaper then commercial

Answered 2 years ago by Jimzadd

1
Vote

I just had a 40 gallon tank replaced in the Chicago area. Set me back $1445. Friends who had similar repairs done later told me I should have paid around $600. I found the exact model they installed online for $445. The repair took less than 1 hour without any complications. $1000 for labor + reasonable markup? Seems pretty excessive to me.

Source: https://www.plumbersstock.com/40500?g...

Answered 2 years ago by tracyb888

1
Vote

The one point that I dont see in any of these answers is, The pro is a licensed plumber and had to go to school and get a license, pay fees, ect. The handy man has none of these and if he messes up, you have no recourse. He is also breaking the law by charging over a set $

Answered 2 years ago by gerg58

1
Vote

We just had a gas water heater installed for $1700, the water heater is
beside the dryer (which was commonplace in homes built in the 70's)--now
against codes, so we had to have some venting and other stuff installed
to bring it up to codes. We got a 50 gallon tank and a water heater
that has a warranty of 10 years. We never knew how much you could extend
the life of the water heater if you vaccuum around it every month or
so--especially since it is beside the dryer. Live and learn. We used an
Angie's List recommended plumbing service and he was very good about
explaining what had to be done. I think the price was high, but it took
him several hours and we got a really good brand water heater with a
better warranty than most.

Answered 2 years ago by sscrugg

1
Vote

In NJ, you should expect to pay between 500 to 1200 for labor plus the cost of the water heater and parts.


If you have a straight up install, meaning access to the heater is easy and the previous install was up to current code, than you are looking at an easy labor cost of about $500 plus the cost of any township permits, the heater and misc parts.


Now, if you are not up to code, or add additional issues, such as the heater being in a small closet, blocked by other appliances you are looking at a much higher cost.


If you have venting issues, the cost can skyrocket depending on what is required to get a proper vent, in some cases, it may require the plumber to enlarge a masonary stack opening from 3" to 4" and run a new 4" vent, which can take hours.


Convert to a newer high efficency unit that requires power venting via PVC and you might even be looking at a $1500 labor charge.


Don't forget one important item about a gas appliance - the gas or the vented carbon monoxide can do a lot of damage to people and property. If you don't know what you are doing, get it done by a licenced pro.


By the way, the low ball prices you see at big box stores, like "$300 water heater install" is a bite price, most likley of an electric heater in with obstical free install. Like someone mentioned above, by the time they were done with Home Depot, the labor went to $1000.


Answered 1 year ago by puter199

3
Votes

I feel better after reading these answers. I recently had a 40 electric water heater installed for nearly $1000, including the cost of the heater. I felt ripped off at the time, but it took two workers 3-4 hours total at my condo. This does not include the time it took them to purchase and transport the new water heater to my place or the time it took to discard the old one. I used a licensed plumber. Watching them work, I was glad I did not try to do any part of this myself. Seems like a lot of money, but reading the rest of the responses it seems what I paid is in the ballpark. My only regret is that I did not pay more attention to the warranty at the time. Might have been worth it to pay a bit more but have a better/longer warranty. I live in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Answered 1 year ago by LizM115

11
Votes

It is in the best interest of the home owner to get two or three estimates from a licensed plumber. A HANDYMAN is not typically a LICENSED PLUMBER! In most states, you have to have a plumbing license, issued by the state to be a plumbing contractor. Codes are very strict as to how a water heater is installed. These codes are put in place for the home owners protection.


I served a 5 year apprenticeship in the plumbing trade and I have a lot of time and money wrapped up in my training and contractors license. A water heater carries a lot of stored potential energy. I'm sure if you look on youtube or someplace you will see what happens when a water heater explodes. I also believe mythbusters did an excerpt on this as well. When a water heater explodes, it essentially becomes a missile. Is this something you want a HANDYMAN doing? Seriously?


I've seen labor rates for mechanics at automotive dealerships at $120/hr. Yet it seems when it comes to plumbers, everyone thinks anything over $20/hr is too much. Then, they believe they shoudn't have to pay for the time it took the plumber to spend his gas, his time, use his truck to go get the water heater and materials it takes to do the job correctly?


Skilled labor is the only true resource we have left in this country. Yet, once people complain how much it cost them to have some plumbing work done, they go shop at Wal-Mart, where nearly every item is made in China!


I don't gouge customers, because I want them as repeat customers. Any advertising I do, cost me money, which is part of my overhead. (By law, I am required to post my license number on any advertising or signage.) What license does a Hanyman have? A handyman has not been trained to work on plumbing systems! When you get sick, who do you call....certainly not your handyman.


Rates for plumbers in my area are on average, $70 - $80 an hour. Expect a markup on all materials purchased or used to complete your job. Usually anywhere from 25% -50%. If a plumber disposes of your water heater, that costs them labor time and money to dispose of your old water heater properly. They just don't dump it on the side of some county road.


Don't count on the big box hardware store for quality plumbing either. Get a good plumber yourself by asking friends, phone book, etc. By doing so, if there is a problem, you know exactly who installed your unit and who you should call.


So for a water heater, this would be the bill you would get from me or any small, honest plumbing company in my area. (Central Indiana)


One technician @ 3 hrs x $75 = $225


40 Gallon water heater @ $300 x markup (35%) = $405


Miscellaneous fittings and markup = $75


Disposal of old unit $50


Your grand total from me would be $755


Labor rates and markup will vary slightly from company to company and from area to area. If you want it done cheaply, wait for Chinese plumbers to invade our country in hoardes and I'm sure you can have it done for next to nothing. When that happens, all the good plumbers in this country will shut their doors because we won't be able to compete with labor rates so cheap. If you think I'm kidding, briges are being built in California with Chinese welders as we speak....yet no one seems to care.


Answered 1 year ago by Zobie08

2
Votes

Last week, my 10 year old water heater in our 10 year old house started spurting from the top. Luckily we heard the water as it had just begun to leak (8 AM), and shut off the inflow, and spent the next few hours soaking up the leaked water around the heater from the concrete slab.
I got hold of our nearby licensed HVAC company (in Upstate NY). They gave me a price for AO-Smith 50 Gallon gas heater at $1100, total installed. We needed it so I said OK.
The heater itself can be easily had for about $475, delivered. The rest, about $600, must be labor and a few small parts/pipes may be. I think the labor should have been no more than $300, plus another $100 for other stuff, max. So may be overpaid by $200….?

I was not present when he was installing the heater. He stated that a pan to catch the future leaks can be used but we did not have a drain in the basement near the heater. When I got home and looked, there is of course a drain just 6 feet away. That pisses me off because now we have to remove all plumbing and move the heater to install the pan, especially after paying them their asking priceL.

Answered 1 year ago by nycap

1
Vote

NYCAP.......I noticed at the beginning of your post you said water was spewing from the top of the heater? I'm a licensed plumber in Georgia, I have never seen a heater burst from the top, unless a cracked fitting, which commonly happens due to over tightening during initial install. An incorrect customer diagnosis is very common, which is ok, if your plumber has integrity. Some heaters also have Temperature & Pressure Relief valves on top that can mimic a faulty heater. My point is you called in for a new heater without a professional opinion of the problem, not a good idea. It's a hard call when 2 plumbers arrive with a new heater and discover its a $.59 fitting. You also said your heater was on a concrete slab? Is your floor concrete? That would explain the extra cost for a pan if it is....Hope this helps someone facing a major expense like a water heater.

Answered 1 year ago by allen30577

0
Votes

Actually my Richmond power vent 50 gallon model just started spewing out the top last night just like the post above - right out the top of the tank, underneath the power vent. the plumber quoted a new State-brand 50gal gas model with power vent (apparently the need for power vent makes a big difference in price according to the plumber and folks posting should make this distinction) at $1523 +tax. this seemed really high to me and drove me to find this sight. Can anyone confirm; would this price be out of line for an install of this type?

Answered 1 year ago by thanscher

0
Votes

I live in NJ near the Trenton area. Today,Saturday,10/27/12, I woke up and went down to my basement to do a load of laundry and there was water all over the floor. I heard a dripping,water running,sound coming from my hot water heater and water was every where. I looked under the water heater to see that water was dripping profusely from underneath. My hot water heater stated on the outside that is was made in 1984. I lived here for 20yrs myself,so I knew getting it repaired would only prolong the inevitable. I have a worry free contract with PSEG so I called them first. They quoted me different prices from $999 to $1499 which included install and delivery. They also said I would have to pay for a permit. I live alone and work monday through friday,so I needed this done asap. I went for the $999 and they said someone will call me back to let me know when the plumber is on his way. It was less than 10minutes and the call came in the they were on their way.They sent Sanders plumbing and they quoted me $899 for the one PSEG quoted for $999. I called Home Depot and they were more money and I had to wait until Monday. I also am able to pay it off interest free for 12months with my pseg bill every month,they were out today and I was up and running in a couple of hours. The total for all including a 6 yr. warranty was a total of $1064. I am satisfied with the outcome.


Answered 1 year ago by kmarie471

1
Vote

I feel sorry for you all that are in union states. You pay a lot more for the identical work than us in Georgia. In the Atlanta area, I use a licensed plumber who specializes in water heater replacement and polybutylene line replacement name Greenlee Plumbing. I've used him for a couple of rental houses over the last few years, and it's a flat rate for the job. They advertise their rates on their website, e.g., $600 for a Rheem 6-yr, $850 for an 8-yr, $300 if you supply the tank, etc. I've actually installed a gas water heater myself. If the heater is easily accessible, it's an very easy job especially for a professional. It's not rocket science.

Source: http://www.polybutyleneatlanta.com/wa...

Answered 1 year ago by comjohndoss

0
Votes

My gas water heater just failed. Fortunately the mfg said it's under warranty. I received quotes from $200 to $300 for labor to take out the old one and install a new one. I paid $275 because that person could do it same day.

Answered 1 year ago by JRHami

9
Votes

I am a licensed Master Plumber and own a Plumbing company in St Louis. Our rate for a 40 gallon State natural gas heater installed in $975. Thats basic install and haul away of the old heater. This includes, new shut off, 3' of flue replaced, 2 new dielectric unions and the installation of an expansion tank. We also check your static water pressure in your home and counter balance the expansion tank. Its not brain surgery I agree, but I have seen PLUMBERS that cant install one right and would be highly sceptical of anyone who says I can do it for way cheaper. Besides if you have it installed by un licensed plumber and or do not pull a permit you can be subject to a fine in most urban areas when you sell your home and will still have to pay a licensed plumber to come in and inspect it and or bring it up to code. Codes dont change weekly either like I heard someone told someone on here, they change anually if at all. ALWAYS you should call around and get as many prices as you can, DO NOT BUY a GE or a Whirlpool water heater, they are both junk!!! We will not install them even if a homeowner buys it themselves. State and A O Smith are the same company. Also we asume the labor on the water heater parts warranty we install, and that cost is expensed into our quoted price but averaged over 10 water heater installs. Everyone please do yourself a favor and have any water heaters installed by a Licensed Master Plumber, you get someone who is Bonded and insured. Good Luck!

Answered 1 year ago by hockeycoachtim

-1
Votes

I found this thread because I was concerned that I may have been overcharged, but after reading the posts it seems like it was an honest charge. I live in Pittsburgh and paid $650 for a next day installation with a new shutoff valve. I trust this plumber and he always does good work for a fair price...I just had no idea what the "going rate" was. I was guessing $500 so it was close.

Answered 1 year ago by Guest_9448996

-1
Votes

In Chicago and all suburbs, unless you do it yourself, you need a licensed plumber to install a water heater and it must be inspected. A Bradford White 50 gallon regular recovery water heater (MI50), two (four if pipes are iron) 3/4" dielectric unions, new cold water shut -off valve, gas shut-off valve, minor gas piping, minor to moderate water piping, 160 degree fire sprinkler head plus piping, expansion tank and piping (if house is metered and or piped in copper), new 3" flu piping. No flex tubing can be used anywhere. Haul away old tank and permit fee. $1,700 is a bargain. $2,100 is average.

The "do-it-your-selfers" are our best customers. If you use Angie's list, you're going to pay more.

Answered 1 year ago by Northwest Plumbing

0
Votes

I had a tall 50 gal electric water heater installed this week in Dallas, Tx and paid $1150 including city inspection fees. It took 2 people 3 hours as shelving had been built on both sides of the water heater (before I bought the house) so they couldn't just slide it out it had to be lifted up and over; the previous work was also not up to code as it was rigged to drain on the garage floor so they drilled a hole out to an atrium and added piping for it to drain there and they had to add a new electrical box as that was not up to code either. I called the company on Monday and had the new heater on Tuesday. I priced the water heater that they installed and the cost was $487 so that mean I paid just over $500 for labor (and extra parts) plus $150 for inspection fees and I feel comfortable with that.

Answered 1 year ago by GGDallas

1
Vote

Here's what I paid:
$554.80 for a 50 gal water heater with parts & tax
+ $400.00 for installation
= $954.80

It's' for a 4-bedroom house in Orange County, CA. At first I thought the labor seems high but after reading this forum, I think it's fair. Thank you all!

Answered 1 year ago by CCinOC

1
Vote

I am a plumber and this amazes me. People will go out and pay 20,000 for a car that is a piece of junk in 7-12 years. But will balk at 1000 for a 50 gal water heater that is giving them hot water for the same amount of time. Listen people. Part of what you are paying for is someones experience. You want someone who knows what they are doing when you are having an appliance installed in your home that has the potential of killing you and your family. Of course there are rip off artists out there. Just be sure that you go with a reputable company. If there is any problem with anything we install, you can be assured that when you call it will be taken care of. If you call some friend of a friend to save 200 bucks do you think they will be anywhere around when something goes wrong at 11:30 some cold night. Ask around for a good company that will stand behind the work they do. You can just call different companys and tell them what size heater you have and get a price right over the phone. If someone is twice the price of everyone else obviously avoid them. Also if one company is way below everyone else be careful of them as well. Sure you may pay a little more for a licensed plumber but you will be much better off than calling Joe Schmo who usually plows snow for a living but the lack of snowfall has him looking to make some cash somehow. Or the guy who's uncle used to be a plumber and he saw him install a heater once.

Answered 1 year ago by gbailey

-9
Votes

water heater and supplies cost 500 bucks to 600 dollars not $200-300 and 500 buckst is for a cheap unit w/ 6 yr warranty. I would charge 1000 dollars to do it as a favor to someone, by time I go to the house and see the broken unit and leave their and get new one and all the parts I need im already 2 hours into it. Then you have to drain it and disconect everything and dispose of the unit somewhere theirs another hour. All said and done the installation takes 3 hours but all the running around and gas kills ya. You can come to my house and work for me for cheap but Im not killing myself for cheap people like you,but I know that the price of 1500 to $2000 is in the ballpark.If you dont want to pay someone for their time,tools and experience then do it yourself. Its fairly easy if your mechanically inclined and have half a brain. Look at the people in the industry if they can do it so can you. Go buy a shit load of tools and blow your house up. I know some places charge way too much. Im constantly doing favors to help out people the 1 percenters are the problem. They are cheap as hell.

Answered 1 year ago by thermpdynamic

2
Votes

I owned a Rheem 40 Professional gas water heater for 17 yrs, trouble free. Of course it started to leak at 1130 pm on a Sat night during one of the wost blizzards in Bismarck ND history. Sun at noon headed to Menards in 15 in of snow and white out conditions. Luckily Menards did open and it was myself and three others in the entire store. Best customer service ever! Purchased new 40 gal heater transported home. Began calling plumbers for next day install, with winter storm still raging outside was not expecting to get anyone. Got a hold of Curt a licensed plumber and said he would be there next day when he could. Showed up at 11 am took approx 2-3hrs for install new shut off and charged $245.00 Good Old ND.

Answered 1 year ago by dphclh

0
Votes

I recently paid about $500 for a new gas water heater only. Fortunately, my father-in-law is both a firefighter and an experienced plumber, so he was able to correctly install all the gas fittings and test them correctly.

Answered 1 year ago by JPZ

1
Vote

I didn't have time to read all responses. Typically an electric water heater can be replaced in 2 hours. Gas a little longer (vent pipe is usually replaced with new, gas line disconnected and re-installed or replaced.


Occasionally you have to add components to bring up to code. Items may include vacuum breakers and potable water expansion tanks. Adding those two items there alone with the extra fittings needed to install can add close to $100 in parts alone. A 40 gallon electric water heater usually runs somewhere in the $300 range (give or take depending on manufacturer and place of purchase). Gas water heaters can easily add $100 to $200 to the price of just the tank.


I can start draining the tank. I like to connect a pump with hoses and pump it dry. Much faster that way and often is in a basement where it needs to be pumped up to a drain or outside anyway. While the pump is draining I can start cutting. Once it is drained a little I can usually shuffle it out of the way and get the new one in place to start plumbing it up. Sometimes the inlets and outlets match up well the install is quick. Other times you have to re-plumb the lines to line up with them.


Again it will usually take about 2 hours maybe 3 on gas. My personal rates are $40 an hour. Those rates are common for people working solo. Low overhead costs. The company I used to work for was $95/ hr. The benefit to that is they usually have all items you might need stocked in their van. I might show up and find I need a particular fitting and have to run out to get it. A good plumber doing "side work" will look at the job first to get a material list and come prepared.


Getting rid of an old water heater isn't a problem and should not be an added charge. It's almost all metal. There are scrap metal yards everywhere and you usually make a few bucks scrapping them. The company I used to work for would leave them in a designated area in the parking lot. Multiple days a week people would show up and haul away the old stuff for scrap. It was their way of life.


Tough to say how much to replace a water heater. I'd say straight replacement without having to replace other components or having to bring up to code: cost of water heater plus 2-3 hours labor.


Pans to go underneath are not needed unless leakage can cause damage to the building. In a basement I would not put a pan under unless it was on a wood floor. You need to pipe the pan drain somewhere and usually no option in a basement.

Answered 1 year ago by dooner987

0
Votes

I don't portend to know how much any of this should cost, but it seems to be common on these threads that someone will mention what it cost a professional to pay for his training to get into this field. How is that possibly the burden of the consumer ??? Can you imagine someone applying for a job, and requiring an additional salary premium to pay for their education ? Ludicrous. All the varioations in price are a result of the fact that there is no standardization. If an installer occasionally runs into a difficult install, so what ! Have you ever heard of one giving a customer a discount for an exceptionally easy install ? The next time I do will be the first time.

Source: skridder

Answered 1 year ago by skridder

0
Votes

I just paid $580 -$25 senior discount 4 a 40gal total could hav went to home depot got then hav friend do it but he left town , went w/ masterplummers

Answered 1 year ago by tonyminh

0
Votes

For whatever it's worth, I just paid $1,700 (!) for a new GE 50-gallon electric water heater, with a 2-year/12-year warranty. (GE now owns Rheem.) My old water heater was a builder's special POC that was exactly 3 years old!!! I bought this condo new. One of the problems with the old unit was also very hard water, apparently. I could not get a hot shower to last for ten minutes. We first tried replacing both elements, which were covered with lime. Didn't make any difference!


When I checked out prices for the unit at Home Depot, I felt like I'd been ripped off for about $1,000. When I spoke to plumber about it, I was told that Home Depot delivery, installation, and take away is not really FREE. They also don't tell you that installation in a condo is not the same as in a separate house. Old unit was drained off a balcony (onto my driveway), lots of new hookups had to be made, and tray was replaced.


Of course I wish it had been cheaper, but it was becoming a real nuisance, and now I have piece of mind. I hope that you get what you pay for. (Plumber also made several free trips to try to get the old one to work better, before I decided to just get rid of it.)

Answered 1 year ago by PRWins

1
Vote

A water heater is a simple machine. Understanding one does not require a degree in physics. Just be sure to turn off the gas to a gas one, or the electricity to an electric one (flip the circuit switch), before you start messing with it.

An electric water heater is just a big metal pot with a 'heating element' -- a lot like those little coils you can sink into a cup of water to make coffee -- and a drain near the bottom, to drain off minerals that accumulate through the years. At the top, it has a short pipe to let the hot water out, and a short pipe for the cold water to get in to replace the hot water you're using. There's also a place to attach a gas pipe to get gas into it (if it is a gas water heater), or, if it's electric, a plate you have to remove (on top, on mine) to attach wires to get electricity into it. There's also a short pipe with a flimsy metal 'handle-type-thing' which sits on top and "blows first" if there is any problem. If you are only replacing your water heater, you will have the electrical stuff or the gas pipes already there. No problems. Just open that drain at the bottom (connect a garden hose to it and run it outside) so it won't weigh half a ton and you will actually be able to move it. Disconnect it, remove it, put the new one in, and connect it. Simple.

When you go to Home Depot to get your new water heater, ask the help to show you where all these things are located. Watch a You-Tube video if you want. Gas can be turned off before you ever start the job -- there should be a 'cut off' xxxx about 3' away from your water heater. Again, no problem. However ... if it is electric, do not turn the electricity on until you are sure the tank has filled with water. I.e, leave the hot water faucet on until cold water starts running out of it, and push the tank sideways a little bit so you can feel the weight of the water. An empty hot water heater is pretty light -- it's just a big empty tank, after all.

After several years, your water heater will have calcium deposits in it. Open the drain at the bottom, run into it a little with a long screwdriver to loosen the deposits and get the water to drain out, and when you have a few cups out, pour Lime-Away in the top (into either the hot or cold water outlets) and let it sit a day or so to dissolve the deposits. Then you can stuff a hose down one of those outlets and turn it on full force and flush the rest of it out. You don't have to replace the whole !@#@ water heater. If you accidentally burn the heating element out, take down your model numbers, etc., and go to Home Depot and get another one (for $35 or so.) Ask the staff about how to replace it. (It's easy -- just unscrew the plate on the front of the water heater (probably about 2' up from the floor) and pull the old one out and stick the new one in.)

There's nothing mysterious about it. Nothing at all. Nothing -- no matter what -- which justifies more than $150 from a professional. A completely new installation, where you have to run gas pipes to the site (again, not difficult) or provide 220 electric, is a different matter, but again, not rocket science.

Don't let anyone confuse you with talk of a "sacrificial anode rod." That's just a long metal rod hanging down into the tank from the top. It's put in there so that caustic chemicals from the water will 'eat it up' before they attack the metal sides of the water heater ... but it's not really needed. Just flush the tank every five years or so or when it starts "popping" and forget about the rod. (It's probably broken and lying somewhere on the bottom of the tank anyway. It won't hurt anything.) The popping happens when the mineral deposits are dry and heat up against themselves. If there are that many in there, it's time to disconnect the cold water on top, open the drain valve on the bottom, drain a bit of water out (or siphon it out if the drain is completely blocked), and reach for the Lime-Away. If the hot water smells bad, drain enough out to let you pour a gallon of Clorox bleach in there and let it sit for 24 hours.

A water heater can easily last 30 years -- even one that hasn't been maintained much. Fixing them is so easy ... and cheap ... try that before you decide to replace yours.

Source: Experience.

Answered 1 year ago by Guest_97075252

0
Votes

depends not on overhead, but the quality of the work, and how permanent, safe, and energy efficient you would like the installation

Answered 1 year ago by GlennJr

0
Votes

3 years ago I paid a Professional 1200.00 to install a 30 gallon water holding tank for my well, new electric 50 gallon water heater, and a new 220 line to go with the wall 220 heater. All the plumping, electrical, and material except 250.00 for the wall heater that I bought but he installed. Yes total cost 1450.00, Thankyou and have a nice day :-)

Answered 1 year ago by Guest_94048377

1
Vote

Typical installation costs can be found in construction cost estimating references. Aim for residential repair / remodel reference and avoid the prevalent ones for new commercial construction. I have been satisfied with National Construction Estimator. Check your public library, and some cost references available on-line provide a trial period.

To heat water, more money streams to utility bills than to the installer. Consider cost of ownership. Some high efficiency options, such as tankless heaters, can be repaired, with likely longer life. To figure your actual cost, consider the higher cost of efficient equipment over possibly longer service life. Feel free to consider the planet when selecting appliances.

The American Council for Energy Efficient Economy water heater tool provides helpful comparison of technology, service life, installed cost, and cost to own. The pace of energy efficient technology innovation is brisk, so installed costs and efficiency have moved beyond the 2012 update of the ACEEE tool. It's more useful as a guide than for decision support.

I always consider features along with cost. Gas fired tank water heaters now come with automatic gas shut-off safety feature in case of flooding. Some of my energy audit clients have opted for tankless heater after a few inches of water in the basement caused their water heater to shut off. The particular brand they had purchased required a service call to re-establish gas supply to the tank. The tankless unit is mounted above the basement window sill. A flood that would disable this heater would be of Biblical scale! If you’ll stick with a tank water heater, installaiton that includes placing tank above floor of a flood-prone basement might be worthwhile feature.

Source: http://www.aceee.org/consumer/water-h...

Answered 1 year ago by Guest_977812512

-2
Votes

Your formula for total cost seems very reasonable, maybe even a bit high. Of course, the cost of the heater will vary as will the cost of a licensed plumber. I live in central FL and have a terrific handyman who charges $15/hour. He is not licensed but was a welder by profession before being laid off. In this economy, there are many talented and capable people who can do the work for a lot less than what we paid two years ago when this question was originally asked. We trust our guy so the job will be much less than your calculated cost or the quotes of others.


As for hauling away the old water heater, we just put stuff like that at the top of our driveway. The heaters can be recycled for the metals they contain so local treasure hunters gladly collect them for free. You can also advertise on CraigsList to give away your old and broken appliances for free. There are many creative folks out there who will turn your trash into a treasure while keeping our throw-aways out of the waste stream. I encourage you to give them a chance if you can.

Answered 1 year ago by Guest_99905502

0
Votes

In South Texas you would pay about $525 to $575 which includes the trip charge. If the plumber is responsible for picking up the water heater as well as disposing of the old one you are looking at about $725 to $775.

Source: I am a residential construction estimator.

Answered 1 year ago by Guest_9388144

0
Votes

Here in California, in addition to all the things mentioned by others, we also need to have our water heaters strapped and have special lines and shut off valves installed.


This isn't like getting a new fridge, plugging it in and off we go, it does require a lot of expertise in many different fields.


Our 50 gallon replacement - with all new gas lines and copper plumbing, a new pan and straps, came to $2000, but I am certain it is done to code and will be safe in a large earthquake!


The good news is when it is installed correctly, we get a break on our home insurance!

Answered 10 months ago by bcgrote

0
Votes

I have a condo in Seattle and the water heater is located above a stackable washer dryer in a small closet, and the cost was $1500.

Answered 10 months ago by Guest_96128625

0
Votes

I work in HVAC Sales with a big box stores in Canada. The Store chain I am associated with stores right across the country of Canada,located most provinces, and usually sell a brand called Giant Hot Water Tanks, They come with a good warranty. if a customer has Natural Gas in their home, I would suggest purchasing off the store shelf a Natural Gas Power vented Hot Water Tank, sufficient savings of 72% would result using Gas over electricity as per statistics researched by Enbridge Gas, for comparable energy costs for the Toronto Ontario area. Depending on what size of tank is required a 40 US gallon tank would normally sell for $890.00 and a 50 US Gallon Tanks sells for $929.00 + Sales Tax.

For customer who don't have a mini van to take home their purchase we charge $50.00 to go to the store to pick up their purchase, for installation of a Natural Gas Power Vented Tank, we always send a service representative to the customers home first at no cost, to look over the possibilities of placement and venting with 2" #636 white venting pipe to a suitable outside through the wall location, also a 115 volt duplex receptacle should be with in 6 feet of the new tank, should a power outlet not exist, then arrangements would have to be made for such an installation at an extra cost.

For Natural Draft Hot Water Tanks ( using a chimney for exhausting) we charge $300.00 plus sales tax for this service.

Since most of the Hot Water Tanks in the Toronto area are rental tanks with a 120 months rental period with the least expensive average rent for a 50 US Gallon Power Vented Tank going for $24.95 + $3.24 +.37 1/2 cents charge to be added to your gas bill monthly for the privilege of having the charge added to your gas bill. + most rental companies charge an extra $ 200.00 + sales tax for the initial installation.

Amortization over a 120 months + installation would cost approximately ( not to mention yearly rental cost increases not figured in this calculation ) $3654.40 for a 50 US Gallon rental Tank installed with the mandatory 120 month contract.

If you walked into the store and bought the same tank off the shelf, you could buy approximately 3.933 tanks, remember when you own your own tank one does not have to pay $388.80 in sales tax added on to a rental charge.

Source: Rod Crookston. Rona Home and Garden Centres

Answered 10 months ago by Guest_910625021

1
Vote

This is a loaded question as there are many factors that influence the cost of replacing a water heater. When replacing a gas fired heater, you should know that our federal government has mandated a flame guard feature on new heaters sold in the US. This is to guard against idiots that want to store flamables next to their water heater from killing themselves. This has been phased in over the last 8 years or so and now includes most all residential gas heaters. This mandate costs each of us around an additional $150 per tank. Additionally, most new heaters are 40,000 BTUH as opposed to 32- 34,000 BTUH for the old ones. This means a flue upgrade when venting into a masonary chimney or 'B' vent chimney, from 3" to 4" pipe. Code also states (International Plumbing Code) that an expansion tank be installed if there is any type of backflow device on the main water feed to the home, including a pressure reducing valve. Drain pans with drain lines rated for hot water(no more PVC) are also required in many applications (all) where significant damage would occur to the home if the heater leaked. Heaters, as well as other major appliences, should always be permitted and inspected when replaced. This benefits the installer and the home owner with respect to liability. If, God forbid, something went wrong and a fire or flood occurred, the homeowners insurance company could renig on a claim if the unit was installed by an unlicensed person and not inspected. Gas is not something to 'save money' on. Do it right.

I also beg tio differ with a previous responder that said forget about the sacrificial annode rod. Most residential heaters last between 13 and 15 years unmaintained(which is how most folks do it). If you are fastidious about maintaining your heater....flush water out of the drain port twice a year, about ten gallons, and replace the annode rod when needed( it does work or the factory woudn't bother putting them in and they wouldn't rot and fall to the bottom of the tank as the answerer stated. You could get a water heater to last a lifetime. Fortunately for us plumbers, almost no one does this. Annode rods are made of different materials as well, depending on the type of water you have(city or well). Some are aluminum and some are zinc. Be sure and get the right one.

Source: Plumbest2002@aol.com

Answered 10 months ago by Plumbest

0
Votes

bE CAREFUL. iF YOU HAVE lOWES OR hOME dEPOT INSTALL IT, THEY WILL ADD $250.00 ON TOP OF AN ALREADY HIGH PRICE TO COVER "UPGRADING YOUR INSTALLATION TO CODE AND PULLING A PERMIT" First Columbia Station does not require permits. Next Columbia Station does not inspect or have a code to cover this. But the $250 is a standard charge added by the subcontractor anyway. They will install a couple of valves, an expansion tank and if you don't have an electric outlet close by they will install one of those too at even more cost. Most insulting, the will charge $50 to lay a round cookie sheet under your new tank as a spill prevention to meet "code". If you refuse they will not install the thing. I got caught while on vacation and had no choice but to have the work done since I was across the country from home and the tank went. Inquire with one of the stores if you do not believe me.

Answered 10 months ago by Guest_96473874

0
Votes

We're in Oregon and I got a quote from 'the water heater king' in the area two years ago and it was roughly 500 bucks for the install and tank (50 gallon, nothing fancy). Last December after we had a full repipe, the water heater gave and started leaking. we caught it in time before any issues thankfully. went to the same store and the quote this time around was 750ish. In talking to the employee, the cost of water heaters went way up. The price included two hours of labor. We ended up going with a local plumbing company who pulled the plumbing permit, brought in a top notch rheem 50 gallon water heater, and hauled off the old one. cost was $940. We were willing to pay a little more because the company was local, used REAL licensed plumbers, amazing customer service, great warranties.

Answered 10 months ago by Guest_9802304

0
Votes

I found a different approach to for me is a more economical way to purchase a water heater and it has to do first with brand warranty and how to get the benefit of that warranty for myself.


First. I purchased a Reliance 1010 which has a ten year parts and 1 year labor warranty in 1996. it performed fine all its life for 15 years with no problem. I decided to replace proactively so I would not need a plumber in a high urgency situation which is a high cost situation.


So Reliance gave me 15 years of fine service life and i decided to replace with another Reliance 1212 which has a 12 year parts and one year labor warranty. So I purchased at my leisure after shopping around for hte best price so a skilled plumber would not be wasting his time picking up and delivering. All I needed the plumber to do was drain, remove and install the new one and dispose of the old one.


A 6 year warranty Reliance was $370 and a 12 year Reliance was $499. This was a no-brainer as it cost the same to install either so I considered the extra $130 a bargain for the additional warranty. PLEASE NOTE: the warranty is dependent upon their being an expansion tank installed which I purchased for $35 and had the plumber install.


Getting warranty coverage is what is going to be a complicated process. My view is that it is better to take responsiblity for having a well warranteed unit, at the lowest cost, that has a history of good service life which for me was and is Reliance. Getting 15 years and still running fine for a 10 year unit convinced me to stay with Reliance, coupled with their 12 year warranty. True, if I have a failure I expect I will have to pay the plumber for the labor and most likely the part and then have to seek a claim with Reliance in an effort to get reimbursement, assuming the part was not readily available at the time of the failure. My conclusion is that water heater installations are labor intense, involve electric/gas, are often done under emergency conditions and it is not realistic to expect the plumber to be on the hook for the manufacturers warranty. My solution it to minimize the plumber's responsiblity, replace proactively when you can shop for economical installation and do not expect warranty coverage from your plumber who very likely cannot take responsiblity for making such a claim with the manufacturer.


As far as the cost of installation that I incurred, I bundled the labor with a highly competitively priced furnace purchase so the contractor did not have to make an incremental trip here to pick up or to install. Based upon the cost of other furnace quotes, I estimate that I paid about $300 for the additional labor to install the water heater. I would estimate a total cost of $800 for the 12 year Reliance water heater installed plus the $35 for the expansion tank or $835 total, with me being responsible for water heater pick up. Bottom line: I suggest you consider Reliance if it is available in your area, that you consider going with the longest warranty possible if it makes economic sense (like this case) and that you preventively replace before it leaks so that you can control the timing and competitively select your plumber-- obviously using Angie's list to select your plumber.







Answered 9 months ago by SeaJay

0
Votes

I am a 50+ year old single woman and had no trouble installing a new basic water heater myself. I have a pickup truck. I found one I liked at Home Depot for about $300. They loaded it into the truck for me. I was able to unload and spin it into place myself after disconnecting the old one and rolling it outside. It comes with installation instructions which were very simple to follow. Just be sure to buy one with the overflow pipe in the same location as your old one. There were plenty of recyclers in the phone book who were happy to come pick up the old one at no charge the following day. It took me one afternoon...

Answered 8 months ago by Guest_95387759

-2
Votes

The short answer is "A whole lot less than it does cost" especially if you get the job done through a big box store. You should never ever get a water tank installed by a big box store unless they have some ungodly special going on. This is not sour grapes it is just a fact that Lowes or Home Depot or what have you all do it the same. They contract the job out to a "plumber". You pay union rates for the plumber, plus tyhey will "upgrade you to code" at flat rate costs for each item upgraded. They will install ball valves for about 50 bucks each, usually 2 of them. They will install an expansion tank for another 150. They will install a new gas valve, another 50 bucks. They will have an electrician install an outlet if you do not have one close enough (lots of new tanks need 110 volts even if they are gas fired) They charge you for getting a permit even if none is required (happened to me) My township does not require permits and has no interest in your improvements to existing structures and also no building code to comply with. But do not worry, the store will find a county, state or federal code to comply with to charge you more. Last but not least, to add insult to injury they "install" a cookie sheet underneath the new tank as a "spill protector" (non-existant code again). For the cookie sheet you get a deal, just You guessed it 50 bucks!!! It cost me a $1,000.00 {one thousand dollars} PLUS THE COST OF THE TANK!!! to have the tank installed and it took 2 guys about one hour to complete. Oh yes, I almost forgot, they did me a great big favor and hauled the old one away (no doubt for scrap value or to re manufacture it) I was out of town when my home tank failed and I had no choice but to let them handle it for me. So if convenience is all that matters and you have lots of money that obama did not take yet, make one call and get it done by a big box store. But if you are normal and have any other choice call a real plumber who will probably do it for 300 bucks.

Answered 8 months ago by Guest_96473874

0
Votes

In the Annapolis, MD area, I just replaced my 22-year-old 40gal, leaking gas hot water heater with a new Sears 50-gal, 12-year warranty that cost $534 (on sale). The local plumber charged $757 to install it, which included replacing 4' section of hot water copper pipe that had cracked and was leaking, and removing the old tank. The install also had some positioning issues (the new tank was larger) to avoid some shelving we had, requiring two extra 45degree bends in the hot and cold water inlets to avoid the gas vent which meant there were 8 new copper connections, not including the expansion tank. Additionally he charged $167 to replace the 1/2" gas valve with one that is up to code (the old one was from 1967, was missing a check valve among other things, and was corroded). I also had him install a 2gal expansion tank on the cold water side which added another $160. Total cost was $1084 for install and $534 for the tank. The entire job took nearly 3-1/2 hours. All in all, I believe the install cost was a fair price. If your install is simpler, you don't need an expansion tank, etc., you might pay as little as $500 for a gas heater install and could pay for a cheaper tank. The expansion tank is not stricly necessary (and he explained that), but if the city ever decides to put in check valves to restrict back flow, having the expansion tank will prevent stress (and banging noises) on the cold water side -- it is basically a good idea to have one. I was ready to ask for it anyway, and was pleased when he volunteered that I ought to install one while doing the other work. He was able to mount it in a way to keep the shelving space I wanted. As for buying a more expensive tank with a longer warranty I'd recommend it. The tank I bought had an interior glass coating compared to the cheaper one, so it should last longer. If you do the math, extending the life of a unit by 50% is worth 50% of the install cost, so even for a $500 install it would be smart to pay $200 more for a longer-lasting tank. Not to mention not having to deal with the whole thing for a longer time.

Answered 8 months ago by SteveD46

3
Votes

I am so glad to see this question posed. I own a small residential plumbing business in the Los Angeles area, and we charge roughly $900 to replace a natural gas storage style water heater. As one of the answers did a good job of explaining; there is a substantial amount of overhead involved in operating a contracting business, especially in California. I also noticed reference to Home Depot and/or Lowe's in several of the answers. These kind of 'big box' stores have been a huge factor in changing the face of contracting.


My grandfather was a Plumbing, Heating, & Air Conditioning contractor for over 60 years in Indiana. His business model incorporated purchasing materials at wholesale and then re-selling the products at retail as part of the profit margin. Thanks to the manufactures, that has gone to the wayside and the purchase price I pay as a contractor is either exactly or nearly the same as the customer would pay. Therefore, for me to make a profit, I have to make it in the labor portion of the job. This leads customers to believe they are paying too much or more than they should have to. But here is the reality...


Customers expect our prices to be in alignment with Home Depot or Lowe's, but what they fail to remember is two-fold:

1. The manufactures of plumbing products are producing two levels of products for the most part. The merchandise they market through the 'big box' stores and a product line distributed via 'wholesalers'. A good case in point is a lavatory faucet. Though they may look indentical, if you purchase a lavatory faucet at one of the 'big box' stores, you will find that the pop-up drain included is plastic; whereas, the drain assembly from the SAME manufacture of the equivilant model purchased at a wholesaler will typically be brass. The same holds true for much of the inards of the product. As for water heaters, I recommend customers spend a few minutes reading reviews of the brands sold at the 'big box' stores before the consider purchasing. They will most likely find they should steer clear.

2. It seems most customers fail to calculate or consider the costs involved in acquiring the materials. Someone has to go shopping. It takes time, some product knowledge, and the appropriate transportation. To protect our common interests, I like to purchase wares that won't likely need serviced for many years and have strong customer support system if they do. It is very frustrating as a contractor to have a client assume I should provide a better quality material at the same price posted on the 'big box' retailers websites. My brother, who is also a Plumbing, Heating, & Air Conditioning contractor, likens it to taking your own steak to Ruth's Chris and expecting them to cook it for you and be willing to take it back if it is not right.


I won't deny that there are plenty of unscrupulous contractors out there, but if you are using Angie's List to source your providers, you ought to be able to weed them out easily. In general the 'ole adage still holds true... "You get what you pay for"




Answered 7 months ago by Hermanhoggenflogger

1
Vote

I worked for a medium sized appliance and plumbing business for many years and the bottom line is they know you need a water heater. It is an installation they can and do make a large profit margin on. Especially when you consider they also get a contractors discount for many of the supplies. I laughed at one of the comments here about paying more for their water heater installation because they needed a drain pan. A decade ago they cost about $20.00 and the truth is they are not much more now. The same thing is true for air conditioning installations. I have always thought it is almost criminal to see $2000.00 worth of air conditioning equipment bill out to the homeowner for $10,000.

Answered 7 months ago by Guest_915781229

-1
Votes

it depends if mark group installs it. first you have to consider cold showers. then you have to consider having an arbitration held against you by their attorney and their arbitration atorney. by the way, their attorney and their arbitration attorney are both from princeton...what a surprise!!! they got that market set. MY INSTALLATION WAS AN ABORTION!!!!!!!

Source: DOUGLAS JONES

Answered 7 months ago by Guest_92676625

0
Votes

New Premier 40 gallon natural gas water heater installed on December 31, 2013. Total cost for tank, parts and installation with 1 year labor warranty was $699.00. Not do it yourself people, so had it professionally installed.

Answered 6 months ago by Guest_96887623

0
Votes

Yes

Answered 5 months ago by Guest_99646251

1
Vote

Having a water heater installed can vary from state to state. Size of water heater comes in to account as well and brand. Now I have seen people here stating they had home depot come out and install there GE water heater with a great warranty. I'm sorry but who installed this water heater for you. A third party contractor no home depot. When your water heater fails you might want to understand home depot wants the whole water heater back for a warranty. Now do you think the contractor who works through home depot is coming back to remove this water heater and reinstall a new one for you. Guess again he just installed this for you and he doesn't warranty anything. Plumbers who sell top of the line water heater like Bradford White will warranty it. First there is a cost for a good water heater. Haven't you heard the old saying you get what you paid for well GE would be just that, bottom of the barrel cost for bottom of the barrel water heater. Any customer can walk in and buy a water heater from Home Depot. You can't do that with Bradford Whirte. If you buy a good water heater from some person advertising they will sell this to you then watch out. No warranties from some on line sales. I don't care what they tell you. Bradford White only sells to qualified plumbers. In at Washington DC area you will pay $1500 for a 50 gal electric water heater installed and $2.000 for natural gas installed. In Washington DC and Maryland and many States you need to install a thermal expansion tank by code. Many systems that are being replaced have old fill valves and the plumbers need to install a new ball valve, brass tee for expansion tank and copper plus fittings. Labor time. They pick up the water heater and they take away you old one. How many of you own a car that's 12 years old. Not many I'm sure, how much did that car cost you that you probably got rid of after 7 years $20.000 $60.000 so a water heater you use day in and day out for 12 years maybe more cost you $1500 and you complain like here's the home depot cost because you were in the store. Labor is not free my friends and other than GE a good water heater will cost you. Bradford white is a limousine and GE is a Volkswagen so witch one is better quality and going to cost you for quality. Thank you.

Answered 5 months ago by USMC

0
Votes

I am a small person with no professional experience in the building trades. I just replaced my gas water heater with an electric. I did about an hour of research. Labor time was about 45 minutes, most of which was finding my tools. I would not be willing to pay more than $200 for professional labor and removal. Some of the big box stores will take back your old unit if you drop it off. That is what many of the local contractors do here, even when they haven't purchased from the store.

Answered 4 months ago by Guest_9385578

2
Votes

I see that this is an old question so moot for the person originally asking but seems like people are still answering so I'll add my 2 cents.


A couple of months ago I had to replace a water heater. I ordered one from Lowes, that included installation. It was about $250. for the heater and about another $250 for installation. When the plumber arrived he said that it'd be an ADDITIONAL $500. because of this and that, ("it's an old system", needs additional parts, labor, etc.). Well - long story short, I just had him leave the heater. A couple of days later my brother installed the heater in just over an hour and it did not require ANY additional parts. ALL the parts needed CAME WITH the heater.


So in my experience - the whole "add this much for this part, and this much for that part" is well.... not accurate. These parts came with the heater. And it was an easy install. Frankly - IMHO, this is a common rip off. I have no problem paying for someone's time and expertise. $250. was a fair price to install something that should take less than 2 hours of time.



Answered 4 months ago by Guest_9714279

0
Votes

Are there any additional materials? Is there a permit pulled? Is the water heater AT ALL COMPARABLE to box store heaters? I.E., a non-box store water heater, retails for more like $600.00 . Also, we also warranty the heater and labor. I recently replaced, for no charge, a heater that was 5yrs, 11 months old. You get what you pay for and I would expect you to be calling a plumber in the upcoming years, and will be unhappy about it. Good Luck

Having said all that, we charge $1050.00. It also includes picking up and disposing of old heater.

Answered 4 months ago by Guest_9502426

0
Votes

I live on Long Island and hired a plumber to replace my very old worn out 40 gallon gas hot water heater with a new 75 gallon one. The complete charge was $1,800.00. This included everything - tank, expansion tank, labor, hauling away the old one, etc. Not knowing about codes, etc., I am glad I hired a professional and would do it again in a heartbeat.

Answered 3 months ago by Guest_9177030

0
Votes

i bought a ge gas water heater $500.00 removed old one found loose gas line installed by pro,installed new one,took old one to scrap yard and got a few bucks for it.

Answered 3 months ago by Guest_98356521

-1
Votes

Pay no more than $600.00-$700.00 labor and material. 40 gallon water heaters cost approx $400.00

Answered 3 months ago by sethbonilla

1
Vote

Lower Merion, PA - right outside of Philadelphia.


Well, the first water heater I bought from a local heating and air conditioning firm (and plumber) was $1795, which included installation. This was for a 75-gallon water heater and it was manufactured by Bradford White.


The day after it was installed, I called the local vendor who sold it to me and installed it and said I was running out of hot water in about 10 minutes in my shower. It was only then I found out the WARRENTEE from Bradford White was worthless, and so was any guarantee from the installing plumber.


I wrote the following letters to document what happened when I thought this would be going to court. The time I wasted on this, plus the two months of cold showers me and my family endured, and the BS we got from both the Heating and Air Conditioner contracter who sold and installed the unit and from Bradford White were an injustice to paying top dollar to what I thought was a reliable vendor and manufacturer. I also found out how far Bradford White would go to invalidate any supposed warrantee that came with their water heater.


The second water heater I bought was $1,500 for a 74 gallon unit manufactured by A O Smith. It's been working fine and we get 3 or 4 showers with plenty of hot water to spare — no problem. Here are the letters. I have left out the name of the installing sales and supplying HVAC contractor because when they didn't cash my check after 6 weeks, and I finally stopped payment on it (first time I stopped payment on a check in 30 years). This is the ONLY reason I don't show their name. I can only surmise he sold me "gray goods" and/or knew there was a problem with the unit. I hope you didn't get this water heater installed in your home after me... Here are the letters:


G’day, XXXXXX…

This is to confirm what you already know, but I wanted to demonstrate a course of timed events in this formal correspondence.

In the beginning of this year I purchased a 75-gallon Bradford White water heater from you for $1,795. On Monday, January 7th your technicians delivered and installed it in my home.

Then very next day when I showered I found I continually had to turn down the cold water to maintain a constant temperature. My showers range from 10 to 15 minutes in time. It is in the same shower I have used in my house for the past 30 years.

I called and alerted you to this on Tuesday the 8th, and you sent a technician to resolve this. Your technician called technical support at Bradford White who gave him a few tasks to perform to figure out the problem. Among the first was supposed to be a definite test to see if the problem was the water heater: turn the shower on hot and wait, then feel the hot water pipe exiting the water heater. Initially it was hot, after ten minutes is was tepid, proving the problem was in the hot water heater unit.

A dip tube was ordered and a few days later installed. Thank you for this prompt service.

The problem continued, I called you and your technician came back. During this visit a temperature test of the shower flow showed after 3 minutes the water temperature dropped 10 degrees. After ten minutes the water temperature dropped 44 degrees, from an initial hot of 146 down to 102.

Bradford White on the phone then pointed in every conceivable other direction than a problem with the water heater itself.

During the next visits additional tests were performed. Tech support at Bradford White suggested the shower was using too much water and your technician measured the water flow from the tub (6 gallons/minute) and from the shower head (5 gallons/minute).

I assured your technician that it was the same shower I have been using. I also assured him I don’t turn on the hot water full on and take a shower, but mix the hot water 50-50 or thereabouts with the cold water. Their theory also doesn’t account for the recovery rate of hot water being made while the shower is running. Let’s face it: the problem lies elsewhere.

Tech support at Bradford White continued to query everything else but the water heater, looking for - searching for any other reasons a 75-gallon water heater of their manufacture was incapable of supply hot water for a fairly brief single shower.

If this water heater won’t perform for the reason I purchased it - plenty of hot water for showers for a house of 5 people (like the last one I purchased from you) I’d like it repaired. If it can’t be repaired - which is what I’m seeing, I’d like it replaced.

I definitely don’t want to be faced with only one person can take a shower without running out - or low - of hot water. Right now three people live here and the situation isn’t good: one person gets hot water, one gets warm water, and one person gets a cold shower.

And, XXXXXXX, I don’t want to worry about it in 6 months: two of my three kids are in college, they return for a month at winter break, a week at spring break and are home for 4 months in the summer. I purchased a larger 75-gallon tank for the reason of not running out of hot water for all of us. We all get up early for our jobs, and showers are taken in succession.

I’m not a water heater technician, and I have no idea why this

is such a poorly performing unit. It’s also not my responsibility to trouble shoot. I did my part, paid for the unit and the install. That was the hard part - paying one thousand seven hundred ninety five dollars. And the unit doesn’t work. It was DOA.

The ball is in your court. It’s been over a month, and I’d now like a resolution. Thank you.


Letter Two:


Dear Mr. XXXXX,

This is to confirm the synopsis of our conversation of my

phone call to you on Tuesday, Feb 25.

It has been almost two months after the installation of the 75-gallon water heater I purchased from you, and you installed in my home on January 6th. It’s been almost two months since we have been able to take a hot shower without turning the cold water faucet down repeatedly so the shower water remains hot.

Only one person in the house is able to take a hot shower, and this shower lasting only ten to twenty minutes until the hot water runs out. The other two people living in this house take either a warm shower or cold shower.

Despite repeated calls to your firm, and outside of your technician making a single trip to replace the “dip tube” on the water heater, you have not made any effort to fix this condition.

You have, however, sent numerous people out to “measure the temperature” of the water, inspect the plumbing to see if they could find any possible other place in the house to blame for the hot water not working correctly, including looking at each faucet and water valve connection for a safety crossover valve (there are none) to see if cold water was returning to the tank from another direction (it isn’t).

In addition, the Bradford-White plumber-assigned technician was dispatched to my home, not to repair or replace the water heater, but to measure the flow, and take water and time temperature readings from the shower head I have been using for the past 40 years.

His findings showed a 27 degree drop in water temperature when you turn on the hot water (only) at full blast (5-gal/min) for 9 minutes.

I assure you my own findings are quite different: I can’t take a single shower for 15 minutes without running completely out hot water, and I turn the water on at about 1/3 flow. This condition is unsatisfactory on a brand new, one thousand, seven hundred ninety five dollar 75-gallon water heater.

You made 2 recommendations to resolve this problem:

1. To wait for the unusual and severe cold weather to subside so the water from outside entering the tank was not so cold. And

2. to get a smaller, lower volume shower head.

When I said I wasn’t willing to do either of these, you said I was “Not willing to work with you.” I informed you the resolution I now wanted would be replacement of the hot water heater that was not working since day one of its installation with a new unit from a different vendor (as I have already seen first hand the incredible hassle of the non-existent warranty from Bradford White).

I advised you I had on Monday, Feb. 24 stopped payment on the check I gave you until the issue was resolved. You called this “Theft of services.” I mentioned I was more than willing to issue another check upon a resolution of this problem. This is the first time I have stopped payment on any check in over 30 years.

In finality, you said you would talk to some “plumber friends of yours…” which didn’t sound like this faulty unit was to be replaced - only to look for more reasons it was fine.

As an aside, this is to let you know how dissatisfied I am with your not-so-professional services. While I paid list price for this unit because of a promise of a good product with a solid warranty from both you and your vendor, no warranty was provided at all. Instead, you pointed in every possible conceivable other direction in order not to replace the unit that was delivered DOA - not working on arrival. To add insult to injury, you had the gall to tell me I have to wait for warm weather to take a hot shower.

I have showed two months of patience by taking cold showers for both myself and my family, and by waiting for you to provide a viable resolution in a timely manner - which you haven’t. You can now argue with Bradford White as to who is liable for their - and your - warranty. As a consumer paying list price, I didn’t get any warranty at all from either of you. I just got excuses, a hard time, and two months of cold showers.

I will now see if I can find a solution from other resources. I am not willing to take cold showers after shelling out one thousand seven hundred ninth five dollars for a new hot water heater that failed to deliver a single hot shower from day one.


Letter 3

Mr. XXXXX,

This is to confirm my disappointment that the 75-gallon water heater you installed in January continues to fail to deliver hot water for even one single brief shower.

Further, in our conversation on Wednesday March fourth, you continued to attribute the failure to deliver a reasonable supply of hot water to the two reasons you gave earlier: 1. The severe cold of the outside temperature introduces very cold water to the unit tank, and 2. the size of the shower head delivers too much water. You said you spoke with 5 plumber friends who also all agreed with you and said the same thing.

When I repeated my previous statement that I have been using this same shower - and shower head - for the past 20 years and my old water heater properly maintained a shower temperature across several showers, you said you didn’t care if the shower head was 20 years or 20 minutes old, this was the cause, and I needed a restricted-water shower head.

In this conversation, you introduced a new resolve: for you to install a mixing valve on the unit. I believe you said the cost was $529.00, in addition to the $1,795 dollars I paid you for the water heater.

You also said my outstanding balance was due (a result from stopping payment on the check I gave you - the first time I have stopped payment on a check in over 30 years) since the water heater is working. I said I’d gladly issue you a new check with payment in full as soon as the water heater was working satisfactorily, which it isn’t. You advised me it was working, as I could wash my hands and do the dishes or laundry in hot water.

Since you have failed to 1. deliver and install a satisfactory working water heater, and 2. failed to repair or replace the unit although I have requested this many times (I and my family have now been taking showers in cold water for over 2 months); and further 3. failed to insist Bradford-White, whose water heater you selected to install, replace the water heater under their warranty obligations, I have no other choice but to take the matter into my own hands. I have replaced this unit from another vendor and manufacturer.

To have your water heater removed from service and a new one installed to replace it was not a decision I made easily, quickly, or without grave concern; and I was sorry I had to do this. But I am not willing to take cold showers - or have my family take cold showers - for the next ten years.

This letter is to give you the option to pick up the water heater next week, please call for a time convenient to you and I will allow you access. If you are not interested in picking this unit up, I will have it disposed of in accordance with township regulations.


Answered 3 months ago by pattedobkin

1
Vote

Today the year 2014 it should cost 850.00 to 900.0 for a forty gallon gas hot water heater. A little extra for re-working the vent(65.00) to the chimmney.If your paying more than that you are getting ripped off. I know I just got ripped off for 1400.00 dollars for a tank that costs 350.00 to buy. I am from northern new jersey. Live and learn. Do your home work.

Answered 2 months ago by Guest_9982634

0
Votes

Here in Erie, PA less than a year ago, I paid $600 for the tank plus installation. It is a Bradford White 50 gallon gas hot water tank and it's been great so far. The plumber I called was Eric Schaffer. He works for himself and does excellent work.

Answered 2 months ago by Guest_923281224

0
Votes

Here in Georgia, May 2014 I just had a plumber claim that the pressure valve was broken and that cause my 4yr old water heater to break- Therefore the warrantee on my 10 year water heater is not valid. TO replace the 50 Gal Water heater, the expansion tank and the Water Pressure Valve was $1300.00.

Answered 1 month ago by SoapySuds

0
Votes

The first week of May, 2014; I paid a flat fee of $350 for removal and installation of a water heater; included the work for an additional valve that wasn't there. The city required a $50 permit. Total $400. I purchased my water heater from ABT in Glenview, IL.

Answered 1 month ago by Guest_9507563

0
Votes

The answer to that question depends on whether or not you're a homeowner with one house or an investor with many houses. As an investor, I would not pay more than $150 in labor for a water heater installation. I know what is involved and I am also running a business. I can't use a company that charges $400+ in labor. If I did, I would go out of business pretty quickly.

Answered 1 month ago by Guest_9959139

-1
Votes

How much?


A question that has stood the trial of time


Today the question remains

Answered 1 month ago by Guest_9523484

1
Vote

yeh first i say go ahead and try it yourself....haha....suddenly everyone is a mechanical genious! Seems like everyone forgets about the hidden costs...they just want what they want when they want it for the price they want because they heard some xxxx where it was cheaper! Well good luck with that! Life just doesnt seem to work that way! what about the plumbers being mobile and wearing a 25000 dollar vehicle down to a 8000 dollor value in about three years...what about the fuel and time to pick up water heater and haul urs off and drive to ur house twice ...once to look at ur wore out heater and a second time to the plumbing house and a third to ur house to install it and a fourth to discard it where they discard it! And this is all before they do what they have to do at ur house! get a grip people 1000 dollars for all that and the water heater is not robbery....find something else worth while to put the microscope on! And the first people to xxxx are the usually some business owner that wont get dirt under their nails and expect that u should for nothing and that its mindless work anyway....BS! White collars arent the only ones entitled to a reasonable profit,,,blue collars are as well...and if u think blue collars arent using their mind and its simple tasks ...why then wouldnt u do it yourself ...especially for such a costly repair...BECAUSE THERE IS MORE TO IT THAN MEETS THE EYE....


Answered 1 month ago by anthony01

0
Votes

I have been a mechanical contractor in Chicago for nearly thirty years. My company installs an average of 22 water heaters a week based on the past 10 years. Do-it-yourself-ers are our best customers. Especially, if they're trying to spruce up their homes for a quick sale. People always think they know and can do more than they really are capable of. We install only one brand of water heater for residential, commercial and industrial applications which are only available to plumbing contractors. They are the highest rated available and cost no more than the ones big-box stores sell. We replace mostly big box store water heaters because they are inferior in comparison and don't perform well. They also overstate their efficiency.


In Chicago, everything must be "hard-piped." That means no flex connectors-water or gas. Proper flu piping size and type is of extreme importance to prevent carbon monoxide build up and fires. What "was there," does not apply any more as building codes constantly change and improve. It must be sized properly so it provides an adequate amount of hot water. BTU input and recovery rates are more important than actual gallon capacity. Old clogged iron piping and shut-off valves must be replaced.


If a high-efficiency heating systems was recently installed a chimney liner must be installed which could mean an additional $700 to $1,200 expense. Expansion tanks must be installed as well as check-valves on newly water-metered (now required) homes with copper piping. Fire protection sprinklers are now also required. The manner in which a fire sprinkler and its piping are installed is very specific, complicated and must comply with strict building and fire codes.


Installing a water heater is something that must be done by a licensed professional who has experience, is insured and bonded. Legal liabilities by the previous homeowner can be a concern long after the house is sold. Installing a water heater is a lot more complicated and dangerous than unscrewing the connections and sliding in a new one in place of the old one. Exact average cost of a new and properly installed 50 gallon water heater in a Chicago bungalow, replacing a 15 year old unit, is $2,316.00 including a permit.

Answered 22 days ago by Northwest Plumbing

1
Vote

I did it myself (electric heater.) I was going to have a plumber come over, but I started looking at it and it was just 3 threaded connections and 3 wires. It took me about an hour.


The hardest part was getting the old one out, because the drain valve was full of sediment and I could only partially drain the tank.


I paid $338 plus tax at Home Depot for a Rheem 50 gallon.


I would not have done if myself if it needed soldering, venting, new power lines etc, but it was pretty straightforward. I just took the old one apart and put the new one together the same way.


Matt M, Phoenix

Answered 21 days ago by mattthecat

0
Votes

I agree with the last post, did my own, loaded it on the pick up and took it to the recycle place and got paid 15.00 for an old used unworking hot water tank...

Answered 20 days ago by suebob

0
Votes

I'm in Syracuse, NY and I paid $800 for a 40-gallon hot water heater. It would have been $900 if the plumber (licensed, by the way) recycled the old one for me. He told me that if I put it outside, someone will pick it up, which he did, and he was right. After he completed the installation and leaving my home, a truck was already outside picking up the old hot water heater. Nice!

Answered 19 days ago by Guest_9437748

0
Votes

After paying around $800 twice in 20years for new water heaters, we went with a tankless heater about 4 years ago. Total was $1400 w/installation. Has a 20yr warranty. We've saved enough in propane costs that it's nearly paid for itself now. Since water is not constantly being heated & held in a tank but instead is heated as it's needed, the only drawback is that you may have to wait 30-60 seconds for the water to get hot. But, once it's hot, it stays hot. No more running out of hot water, no matter how many showers, loads of laundry or dishes are done. I absolutely love it. Would never go back to a hot water tank. And, it's energy efficient!

Answered 12 days ago by Guest_9387483

1
Vote

As a plumbing contractor, I must caution those who want to install water heaters either Gas or electric, there is a liability risk here. If you do this on your own, and there is a problem, your household insurance will not cover the loss of property. I was at a Home Depot last year and observed someone buying parts for his new gas water heater. He was trying to figure out what venting materials were needed. The problem was he was looking at Dryer vent materials. That is not the proper materials to use. So i guess it would be worthwhile to spend 1,000.00 to 1,500.00 or sometimes more for that piece of mind rather than having to replace your house, or cleaning up after a flood costing thousands of dollars. Us plumbers take on the responsibility , as I am insured for that. For 35 years I have never had a claim on my insurance. I figure at least 3 hours for the job. one hour for bringing,water heater, removal of heater, obtaining permits, then 2 hours install unless there is more piping or venting involved.

Answered 8 days ago by Guest_91334691




Related Questions