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Question DetailsAsked on 5/23/2011

Is $15 per square foot reasonable for concrete work?

Our project is 60 x 3 x 39; (180 square feet). The area is bounded by existing concrete (i. e., little or no form work is needed) but will have to be shaped to channel drainage. Several inches of soil will have to be excavated down the center of the run to accommodate this shaping. The area will receive only occasional foot traffic so I assume little or no rebar will need to be placed. I have one quote (we live in the San Francisco Bay Area) of $2700, or $15 per square foot. I have another estimate on the way, but never having done this kind of project I would appreciate the experience of anyone in the Bay Area (or any other area where the market would be similar) who could recall what they paid.

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2 Answers

0
Votes

Sounds high to me.


BTW - ANY continuous (as opposed to independent blocks like some sidewalks) concrete slab should be reinforced to control natural shrinkage cracking - surfaces that will not see vehicle traffic generally light welded wire mesh panels or roll reinforcing is used.


Such work typically costs about $3-6/SF complete, a couple of cost guides indicate $6-8/Sf more common in Frisco (up to $9-10/SF for vehicle-load reinforced slabs) so sounds quite high to me unless access to get the concrete in there is very poor - like requiring a long wheelbarrow haulage or pumping to get there, which can easily add a few dollars/SF to cost. I would get a couple more bids to see if this guy is high or in the proper range for your site specifics.


One more recommendation - though some may propose 3", I would consider using 4' thickness, not 3 if this is a continuous slab - reduces the incidence of unsightly rust stains from the reinforcing and greatly reduces cracking over time (especially for that large a slab), at not very much added cost because the only added cost is basically the extra concrete - does not add significantly to the labor. Also - do a bit of web research on how shrinkage crack control joints should be put in to be sure they have a WRITTEN plan IN ADVANCE of where they will be put, and how they will be oriented to avoid random shrinkage cracking.


Also - be sure on your drainage that it not only drains away from the foundation (and stays away), but also that the slab does not block current drainage paths.


Also - interface with the existing slabs (and foundation if touching that) should have a bitumastic or similar bond-breaking joint sealer installed, because concrete bonding to the existing slab is pretty much guaranteed to cause cracking in the new slab. I would NOT use just asphaltic fiberboard as is common for expansion joints - they provide the bond-breaker and expansion joint but no waterproofing to prevent water from running into the joint and undermining the slab - press-on bitumastic strip is not very expensive and works beautifully - is applied just before the pour. Another alternative if they don't like that idea is fiberboard but not full height, topped with bitumastic or urethane joint sealer to waterproof it.

Answered 2 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

Sounds high to me.


BTW - ANY continuous (as opposed to independent blocks like some sidewalks) concrete slab should be reinforced to control natural shrinkage cracking - surfaces that will not see vehicle traffic generally light welded wire mesh panels or roll reinforcing like an 6x6 W2.9 (6 inch square grid, #6 wire) is used.


Such work typically costs about $3-6/SF complete, a couple of cost guides indicate $6-8/Sf more common in Frisco (up to $9-10/SF for vehicle-load reinforced slabs) so sounds quite high to me unless access to get the concrete in there is very poor - like requiring a long wheelbarrow haulage or pumping to get there, which can easily add a few dollars/SF to cost. I would get a couple more bids to see if this guy is high or in the proper range for your site specifics.


One more recommendation - though some may propose 3", I would consider using 4' thickness, not 3 if this is a continuous slab - reduces the incidence of unsightly rust stains from the reinforcing, gives the reinforcing the minimal concrete cover it needs to reduce corrosion, and greatly reduces cracking over time (especially for that large a slab), at not very much added cost because the only added cost is basically the extra concrete - does not add significantly to the labor. Also - do a bit of web research on how shrinkage crack control joints should be put in to be sure they have a WRITTEN plan IN ADVANCE of where they will be put, and how they will be oriented to avoid random shrinkage cracking.


Also - be sure on your drainage that it not only drains away from the foundation (and stays away), but also that the slab does not block current drainage paths.


Also - interface with the existing slabs (and foundation if touching that) should have a bitumastic or similar bond-breaking joint sealer installed, because concrete bonding to the existing slab is pretty much guaranteed to cause cracking in the new slab. I would NOT use just asphaltic fiberboard as is common for expansion joints - they provide the bond-breaker and expansion joint but no waterproofing to prevent water from running into the joint and undermining the slab - press-on bitumastic strip is not very expensive and works beautifully - is applied just before the pour. Another alternative if they don't like that idea is fiberboard but not full height, topped with bitumastic or urethane joint sealer to waterproof it.

Answered 2 years ago by LCD




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