Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Submit
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 kstreett 240
2 Guest_9020487 110
3 Guest_9190926 105
4 GoldenKid 100
5 ahowell 95
6 KnowledgeBase 95
7 skbloom 80
8 Guest_98024861 70
9 Guest_9311297 70
10 Guest_9400529 70

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 8/7/2016

Old door 2 springs both sides of door, electric door now told if use it will break brakes or spring going bad

Was told the bracket o on of the springs is going bad. Would cost 800 for just spring alone

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


1 Answer

0
Votes

Below are some prior similar questions with responses about both tilt-up and roll-up doors - more can be found under each of them and also in the Home > Garage Door link in Browse Projects, at lower left -


http://answers.angieslist.com/SE-Mich...


http://answers.angieslist.com/Last-we...


http://answers.angieslist.com/cost-re...


http://answers.angieslist.com/Cost-re...


http://answers.angieslist.com/Side-sp...


Assuming you mean a conventional swing, flat-panel one-piece tilt-up, or roll-up panel type garage door (the lattear the most common residential type these days) as opposed to a metal coil door (which coils itself up into a roll overhead like is commonly used for highbay repair shops and commercial warehouses and small aircraft hangers and such), I would say you need to run away and find other vendors for this - because that is about two or three times what new spring pair and brackets would normally cost. $800 for a spring itself - only time I have seen a price that high was on large military maintenance hangers and shops and airport crash crew firehouses with very wide doors weighing a half ton to a ton or so - and even then I think that price would have bought two springs (without installation).


Normal garage door springs are in the $25-100 range and commonly more in the $50 range for a matched set for the springs themselves, plus labor to replace them which can be in the less than $100 range in cheap labor areas or for side springs on tilt-up or swing doors, as opposed to rollup doors where the axle has to be pulled sideways or sometimes removed to replace the springs where into the $100-200 range is common for labor in higher priced labor areas or for rollup doors. New spring brackets commonly about $10-15 for a set for side-mounted springs (which would normally only break if that part of the door hit something and damaged the brackets) or about $30-60 for a full set (end brackets with bearings and center support bracket/bearing) plus installation maybe $50 more than listed above for springs only.


Overhead coil doors can be another thing - some you can swap out the springs and brackets with the door fully closed (uncoiled) - occasionally you hit a really bad design or too tight an installation where the coil door has to be removed while coiled up or even the entire coil door and housing has to be removed as a unit to change out the axle so probably requires a forklift to do it, but for a small repair or service station size shop or a residential unit which is (very rare for residential garages unless overheight interior with a car lift inside) even then $800 would usually be high by almost a factor of two.


Unless something VERY unusual is going on here, I think you either got misquoted or misunderstood, or someone is trying to bilk you.


BTW - Coil and tilt-up door springs should certainly be changed out as a matched pair unless one is quite new and matched size/color code, because otherwise the uneven force on the door can wrack it and also damage the bearings, as well as overworking the opener. Side springs on flat panel tilt-up doors should be approximately equal in force and same length but because the doors have so much movement and sway in opening anyway, would not be as large an issue - particularly with manually open doors. Certainly with an opener they should be approximately equal to avoid overworking the opener or derailing/jamming its mechanism.

Answered 2 years ago by LCD




Related Questions


Terms Of Use
|
Privacy Policy