Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Submit
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 kstreett 240
2 Guest_9020487 110
3 Guest_9190926 105
4 GoldenKid 100
5 ahowell 95
6 KnowledgeBase 95
7 skbloom 80
8 Guest_98024861 70
9 Guest_9311297 70
10 Guest_9400529 70

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 7/24/2017

Pavement ideas for outdoor bar

I need to install a hard outdoor surface for our outdoor bar hut and 5 heavy bar stools. I need ideas and costs.

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


1 Answer

0
Votes

Ideas - google following search phrase and click on the "Images for" link that comes up first (sometimes after paid ad links) -


- Images for patio pavements


Put a similar search phrase into Pinterest and you will also get enough ideas and sample photos to keep you busy till you die - some people get so into the planning they never actually build the project.


You can find a number of previous similar questions with answers and ballpark costs in the - oh, where is it - either Home > Landscaping, Hardscaping or Lawn & Garden > Hardscaping or something similar, link under Browse Projects, at lower left.


Cost can range from about $2-3/SF for lawn or crushed stone on up to $50-100/SF for imported fitted stone or even more for outdoor tile or cut stone medallion or personalized pattern. Intermediate options include concrete (plain or stamped to provide a pattern or simulate stones or pavears), stained and/or textured concrete, pavers (rectangular or special shaped or interlocking), bricks, cobblestone (fitted or grouted), wood or metal deck, grass pavers, massive stone slabs (up to 10 tons or so in some cases), etc.


Obviously, with the bar stools, if they move around then you may be looking at a smoother deck-like or smooth concrete surface than a rough one like pavers or cobblestones. Also consider suitability for high heels and/or bare feet as applicable.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD




Related Questions


Terms Of Use
|
Privacy Policy