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Question DetailsAsked on 12/8/2016

WHEN WASHING DISHES AND USING THE WASHIN MACHINE WATER COMES UP THE TUB SHOWER AND UNDER THE TOILET

I WAS DOING LAUNDRY IT WAS RINSING AND ALSO IN THE KITCHEN WASHING DISHES AND WATER BACKED UP IN BOTH BATHROOM TUBS AND UNDER THE TOILET AROUND THE BOLTS ALSO THE WATER LEVEL IN THE TOILETS RAISED

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3 Answers

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[Ignore the aaa 's, they are just placeholders - the Angies List computer is stripping out paragraph breaks again !]


Below are links to several previous questions about the same problem - you most likely (unless you have had recent flooding and the pulbic sewers are backing up into residential lines) have a partial blockage in your sewer line - or if on septic possibly an overfull septic tank or backed up leach field.

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The water coming out under the toilet around the bolts also indicates the wax seal on that toilet is not sealing properly, so it should be removed and the flooring/subflooring dried out and the toilet replaced with a new wax seal. Depending on where the toilet is located in the system, if "upstream" of the washer and kitchen that might also be the entry point for the jetting tool or router used to clean out the sewer line so if that is the case would add nothing to the cost of the line clearing - otherwise commonly about $50-75 if done at same time as a sewer cleaning. aaaaaa See the referenced answers for more info on "snaking" to remove a clog in the in-house or above-ground part of the system, and the full-diameter routing or jetting which is commonly needed to clear out accumulated grease and soap scum and fiber buildup which can restrict the line diameter and lead to partial, and eventually full, blockages. aaaaaa http://answers.angieslist.com/Just-da... aaaaaa http://answers.angieslist.com/the-dra... aaaaaa http://answers.angieslist.com/When-wa...

Answered 1 year ago by LCD

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To be perfectly truthful, the leaking under the toilet does not ALWAYS mean bad wax seal - just usually. Can also be caused by:


1) a toilet that was not bolted down firmly so tended to rock, causing cracking of the metal flange on top of the sewer line that it bolts onto.


2) The flange or piping near it can also corrode out and fail


3) the sewer line or flange can be unsupported structurally, so it can move up and down with the weight on the toilet if the toilet is not firly seated on the floor or is high-centered on the flange


4) and rarely (especially if the toilet has been rocking due to loose bolts or the flange was set too high so the weight of the toilet is on the flange) the toilet casting itself can crack - but if that were the case you probably would have had leakage there before now, just in normal use


But if the plumber/sewer cleaner is careful when he pulls the toilet off and looks at the staining and crud/mold buildup on the underside of the toilet, on the wax seal that remains on the flange (or rubber toilet cone adapter if that was used instead of wax seal), and around the outside of the wax seal (if any) left sticking to the toilet, he can usually determine fairly well if the seal was leaking or not. Not definitive because many times the seal separates in the middle as the toilet is lifted off. But a good visual inspection should tell if there are flange, thread, or toilet issues - if not, then almost certainly wax seal was the cause of the leak. Also, if there is no signs of subfloor rot or heavy staining or mold under there, then it likely was not leaking in normal use and only leaked under the slight pressure of the backup from the sewer - in whcih case would almost certainly be a loose or cracked (due to age) wax seal.


BTW - my recommendation on wax seal versus rubber cone boot or plastic toilet adapter they destrict the inside diameter of the pipe so tend to promote clogging just below the toilet - so I recommend wax seal, of correct thickness of course depending on where the toilet bottom cone sits relative to the flange - which if the flange is flush with the floor, then is controlled by whether the toilet is sitting on a thickish flooring material that does not run in under the toilet to the flange (so you need a thick or "tile floor" wax seal, or if the flooring runs in under and flush with the flange or the flooring is very thin like linoleum, in which case a thin or "standard" wax seal is called for. On some very thick flooring like true hardwood plank or stone, and in cases where a thicker tile or laminate floor sits on mud coat or a wood sheet overlay layer which does not go in under the toilet, you need either an extra-thick wax seal, or the flange needs to be raised. Hopefully your contractor will know which to use - but if the toilet is sitting on thick flooring that does not continue in under the toilet, or the flange is set a bit low relative to the floor (like maybe flush with the plywood sheathing rather than the flooring level), you need a thick seal.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD

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Hi,

This is Chris in Member Care. Thanks for your interest in Angie's List!

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Answered 1 year ago by Member Services




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