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Question DetailsAsked on 7/6/2012

We bought a new air conditioner and furnace about 5 years ago. It worked great, but now we have no air or heat in one guest bedroom. HELP!

We have a 23 year old, 3500 square foot home, and replaced our air conditioner and furnace 5 years ago. About two summers later, something happened. The guest room was an oppressive oven.

I called the company who installed the new units, and the service-man could find nothing wrong since the fan and air worked in the rest of the house.
No air was coming through the bedroom vent at all.

I called another company, and he inspected the room and told me there must be something disconnected in the ducts since no air is circulating. He didn't know if cleaning the ducts would be the solution. He suggested that cameras be used to see if there was some kind of blockage.

I fear that I won't be able to sell the house if one bedroom is freezing in the winter and horribly hot in the summer. Has anyone dealt with this before?

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15 Answers

0
Votes

Where are the ducts located,attic,walls,crawl space??

It sounds like something is disconnected, but we need to know where they are located to have an idea of how to proceed.

Source: http://www.bayareacool.com

Answered 6 years ago by BayAreaAC

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The ducts are located in the exterior walls of our home.

Answered 6 years ago by SandraLee

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Where is the furnace? Basement?

Source: http://www.bayareacool.com

Answered 6 years ago by BayAreaAC

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The furnace and air conditioner are in the basement.

Answered 6 years ago by SandraLee

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If the basement is finished then a camera may be needed to find the problem. If it's not finished then it should be easy to follow the duct and find the problem.

They could try a mirror and flashlight from the duct in the wall ,might see something.

Could this have been this way since it was built?

Can you post pictures of the furnace with the connecting supply ducts?

Source: http://www.bayareacool.com

Answered 6 years ago by BayAreaAC

0
Votes

This is almost surely a case of the ductwork separating at some point. The cool air (in summer) and heat (in winter) is being blown into an area where it does no good and might do some harm.

Have you recently finished your basement or otherwise enclosed the ductwork leading to the problemsome room? Unless you have a finished basement the ductwork should be available for inspection and it should be fairly easy to trace the ductwork to the bedroom back to the furnace/AC.


Although not impossible, it would be unlikely that enclosed ductwork would separate, since there's nothing around to disturb it. But yes, it is possible. If the ductwork is enclosed in a wall or ceiling, a camera may be necessary to find the place where the ductwork is separated.


But I can assure you, you need not look for a different problem. Separated ductwork is DEFINITELY why your bedroom has no air going to it from the furnace/AC. Ductwork does not get stopped up suddenly. If it were gradual, I'd suspect maybe a blockage, but since it happened all of a sudden, you can rest assured it's NOT a blockage in the ductwork.

Answered 6 years ago by davidpsr

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With all due respect, it may or may not be a disconnected duct. When equipment was replaced, if that is when the issue started, they could have modified the plenum, due to larger eqipment, and caused the issue. The point is , find the cause as easily as possible, then it can be corrected.

Source: http://www.bayareacool.com

Answered 6 years ago by BayAreaAC

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Thanks for all your responses. Our basement was finished in 2000, but only half of the basement is carpeted with pool table, big screen TV, powder room, etc. The other half is a utility room with sink and refrigerator. My husband has a wood shop next to the furnace/air conditioner room.

We replaced the furnace/air conditioner in 2007, but the problem with no air or heat in the guest bedroom didn't occur until 2009. It happened abruptly, and up until then, we'd never had a problem. I was in the guest room regularly, and one summer afternoon, I walked into what felt like an oven. I knew something was wrong when no air was coming through the vent. It sure sounds like the ducts suddenly disconnected.

The ducts for this room are located in the finished portion of the basement. One service tech tried to remove the basement ceiling tiles to see if any blockage was visible. He saw nothing, and told me that someone would need cameras to diagnose the problem.

Answered 6 years ago by SandraLee

0
Votes

Is there a possibility that the contractors who finished your basement knocked the ductwork loose? Did the loss of air in the bedroom coincide with the work in the basement or anything else that you did to the house? If ductwork is installed properly, it usually doesn't just fall apart. But if it's disturbed, that's a whole other ball game.

You are going to have get someone with a camera to find the place where the ducts have separated. It must be behind a wall or ceiling or you would be able to see it from the basement.

I'm assuming this is a one-story home. Is that correct? If not, is the problemsome room on the top or bottom floor?

Answered 6 years ago by davidpsr

1
Vote

As I stated in my prior answer, the problem with "no air or heat" in our guest room took place "9 years" after we had half of our basement refinished.

The basement was finished in 2000. The lack of heat and air in our guest room happened in 2009. We're not in a 1 story home. It's a large two story victorian with turrets and high ceilings on the second floor.

The ducts in the basement that lead to the second floor problem bedroom travel up to the kitchen on the first floor directly above. Then, they continue upstairs to the guest room. The kitchen air and heat are working just fine. I assume that somewhere between the kitchen and the second floor bedroom above it, there must be something disconnected or blocked.

Answered 6 years ago by SandraLee

1
Vote

Sandralee ~ By jove, I think you've got it! Further examination with cameras and mirrors may only confirm what you already know. Sounds as if you're going to need to get into the part of the kitchen wall below The Hot & Cold Bedroom, where the duct is located. All that's needed is to reconnect the duct and seal it well, then repair and paint the sheetrock. Fortunately for you, you don't need an a/c contractor to do this. You can DIY or hire a handyman.

p.s. Be sure to test that the duct is sufficiently sealed and the air going to the BR again, before you seal up the hole in the kitchen wall. ;-)

Answered 6 years ago by Oleron

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Thanks so much! I will definitely pursue your recommendations and try to remedy the problem. Thanks again for taking the time to help me out!


Sandy

Answered 6 years ago by SandraLee

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We had a similar problem--AC Medic Heating and Air Conditioning solved our problem-reasonable rates and very trustworthy --Spartanburg Greenville SC area--owner Eric Tappan


Answered 6 years ago by ybunch

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You say you have a Victorian. Are the air registers on the floor? Could something have fallen in to block it? When I had a Victorian with floor registers we put a mesh layer under the grill to catch Legos and other small things that fall in.

Answered 6 years ago by jm 1776

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Most ducts have a damper some where in the run to each room so they can be partially or completely shut off if desired. I would look in the basement at the problem duct to see if you can locate a closed damper before paying for some cantractor to use a camera. An other possibility is that it never worked from the start as you say it is a guest room. Did any of the service men try closing the kitchen damper to try to force air to the second floor. My experience is that a lot of victorian homes with that sqare footage may need a 2nd A/C in the attic to sufficiently cool the 2nd floor.

Answered 6 years ago by retreiver2




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