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Question DetailsAsked on 7/17/2017

What to do with a contractor who disappears in the middle of a job?

First time working with a contractor-- called his references, he gave me a business card with contractor license number on it, gave me a good price. Everything was going fine but then he stopped coming by to work every day, started missing deadlines, cutting corners, and eventually just disappeared. Won't take or return my calls or messages.

Moreover, I made the mistake of prepaying a fairly large sum of money for materials he said he'd need. He hasn't actually finished any work and the materials he's brought in shouldn't cost more than 5% of what I've paid him.

Do I have any options short of ticking this guy off and having him trash my house? He's not exactly the sharpest tool in the shed.

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2 Answers

0
Votes

Here are some similar questions with responses FYI:


If you feel he skipped out with the deposit, then a police report starts the ball rolling on a fraud charge and also on documentation to file a claim with your homeowner's insurance policy (assuming in a fraud case that he would not be bonded or insured).


If you feel he may just be too slow and is taking on more work then he can handle, then if he is bonded you first send a certified return receipt signature required letter telling him are cancelling the contract due to failulre to perform on the job, and you want X $ back for the work not done. Of course, if the letter is from a lawyer on his letterhead it carries more impact than if you send it yourself.


Then if he does not come through with satisfactory refund, then you contact his bonding company and "call" his bond - for the $ difference or for them to get another contractor on the job to finish it for the same original total out of pocket amount (bonding company covdering any shortfall).


Double check his business and contractor licensing (if required to have such for the type of work he is doing) - pressure from government agencies for operating without required licenses can also get his attention.


Note part of the end-game here should not only be a refund as appropriate, but also an invoice signed and dated by him showing you are paid in full for the work done (or showing nothing due and contract cancelled, as applicable), and also a lien release from him and from any significant suppliers or subcontractors he had on board for the job.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD

0
Votes


Here are some similar questions with responses FYI:


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http://answers.angieslist.com/How-fil...


http://answers.angieslist.com/What-Co...


http://answers.angieslist.com/What-st...


http://answers.angieslist.com/I-gave-...


If you feel he skipped out with the deposit, then a police report starts the ball rolling on a fraud charge and also on documentation to file a claim with your homeowner's insurance policy (assuming in a fraud case that he would not be bonded or insured).



If you feel he may just be too slow and is taking on more work then he can handle, then if he is bonded you first send a certified return receipt signature required letter telling him are cancelling the contract due to failulre to perform on the job, and you want X $ back for the work not done. Of course, if the letter is from a lawyer on his letterhead it carries more impact than if you send it yourself.


Then if he does not come through with satisfactory refund, then you contact his bonding company and "call" his bond - for the $ difference or for them to get another contractor on the job to finish it for the same original total out of pocket amount (bonding company covdering any shortfall).


Double check his business and contractor licensing (if required to have such for the type of work he is doing) - pressure from government agencies for operating without required licenses can also get his attention.


Note part of the end-game here should not only be a refund as appropriate, but also an invoice signed and dated by him showing you are paid in full for the work done (or showing nothing due and contract cancelled, as applicable), and also a lien release from him and from any significant suppliers or subcontractors he had on board for the job.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD




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