Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Submit
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 kstreett 240
2 Guest_9020487 110
3 Guest_9190926 105
4 GoldenKid 100
5 ahowell 95
6 KnowledgeBase 95
7 skbloom 80
8 Guest_98024861 70
9 Guest_9311297 70
10 Guest_9400529 70

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 4/17/2016

What is the cost of repairing posts on a chainlink fence?

The cement around the posts have heaved out of the ground..about 6 posts

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


1 Answer

0
Votes

Here is a recent answer to a similar question I did which should answer that -


http://answers.angieslist.com/ViewQue...


of course, actual bids will tell you the actual cost range for your specific locale and project. DIY should be easy in your case if they have heaved - jack it out, dig hole down deeper (typically 1 foot below seasonal frost depth or minimum 3 feet embedment) and concrete posts back in after cracking the concrete off them with a sledge hammer or impact hammer. Key is to avoid belling the concrete out at the top of the hole - if hole has done that, buy appropriate diameter Sonotube (waxed cardboard disposable concrete pier form) and use that to form up the concrete around the post, then backfill with loose gravel like pea gravel around that to fill the rest of the hole belling at the top - the paper form (which you leave in place for this purpose) helps keep the surrounding soil from jacking the concrete out. You need minimum 1 foot to 2 foot concrete contact with the hole preimeter at bottom of hole for friction and bonding - use the form only above that level after you have poured the first 1-2 feet of concrete to keep the shaft cylindrical from there to the top. 4 feet total depth best in deeper frost areas, because in some soils 3 feet is not quite enough - but generally 12-18" of sonotube at the top of the hole is enough to eliminate most of the frost jacking because the majority of it occurs in the frequent shallow freeze-thaw zone at the surface.


Fencing would be your normal Search the List category for a contractor, though some people use Handymen for this type of work.

Answered 2 years ago by LCD




Related Questions


Terms Of Use
|
Privacy Policy