Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Submit
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 kstreett 240
2 Guest_9020487 110
3 Guest_9190926 105
4 GoldenKid 100
5 ahowell 95
6 KnowledgeBase 95
7 skbloom 80
8 Guest_98024861 70
9 Guest_9311297 70
10 Guest_9400529 70

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 6/11/2011

What's a fair price for faucet installation?

I had my plumber out to fix the leaky faucet in our kitchen. He said it had to be replaced. I bought a new one, and he charged me $245 to put it in; was that fair?

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


9 Answers

0
Votes

Snarky,

This issue sounds extremely complicated, and I'd get a second and a third opinion from qualified plumbers if you can. When you said the house smelled like sewage a week ago, I thought "uh oh, the main drain is clogged" because that's something like what happened to us. I really don't see how your plumber's explanation of sewage accumulating under the toilet over a period of time due to the "flange" (does he mean the seal?) being gone could be right, or you would have smelled it all that time.

I also wonder what you mean by "our sewer line isn't directly hooked into the main city sewer line." As you probably know, each toilet has a pipe leading to the main house pipe which then goes to the city sewer line. Are you saying each toilet goes directly to the city sewer line and not to a main house pipe?

If your toilet previously worked well, then I doubt a pump is needed. The thing to do would be to have someone figure out whether the problem is inside your house or in the city's pipes. How long is it since the city was out to check their pipes and clean them out if necessary?

As for the insurance agent, telling you "it's not covered" seems to be a popular past-time with them. Once again, I'd get some other opinions and then read your homeowner's insurance policy very carefully to determine for yourself if the problem (whatever it actually turns out to be) is covered. Then if you still get the run around keep demanding to speak to supervisors until you get someone who treats you with respect.

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

0
Votes

Without more specifics, $245 to install a kitchen faucet seems excessive, unless the plumber traveled many miles. Presuming your plumber didn't cause the sewage leak, a grand to trouble shoot and perform repairs while crawling/laying in raw sewage seems reasonable.

If your home's sewer was never connected to city lines, were the pipes disconnected from a septic tank? Unfinished or faulty workmanship? Although many rural homes have individual septic tanks, exposed raw sewage is a serious health hazard. Clean up can be very costly; doubly so because residents might have to relocate until the problems are fixed.

Is it possible your Homeowner's Insurance Agent said clean-up isn't covered because thre is a question about the cause or the policy contains an exclusion? If, not, unless an insurance adjuster physically came to your home & it was determined that the raw sewage problem was caused by owner neglect, the agent saying "sand is not covered", is outrageous!

If it were my home, I'd be out of there except to obtain written estimates from plumbing contractors. Good luck..

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

0
Votes

[quote user="Commonsense"]

Snarky,

This issue sounds extremely complicated, and I'd get a second and a third opinion from qualified plumbers if you can. When you said the house smelled like sewage a week ago, I thought "uh oh, the main drain is clogged" because that's something like what happened to us. I really don't see how your plumber's explanation of sewage accumulating under the toilet over a period of time due to the "flange" (does he mean the seal?) being gone could be right, or you would have smelled it all that time. [/quote]

I hope I'm using the quote tags right. It could be the seal; I'm unfamiliar with the nomanclature. Basically, the flange, or seal, where the toilet is set was not 'seated' correctly; as it was non-existant to the eyes of the plumber. He claimed that it might have worn away after a pipe had burst, or it could not have been installed correctly in the first place. Either way, the result is the same; sewage under the house.

[quote user="Commonsense"]I also wonder what you mean by "our sewer line isn't directly hooked into the main city sewer line." As you probably know, each toilet has a pipe leading to the main house pipe which then goes to the city sewer line. Are you saying each toilet goes directly to the city sewer line and not to a main house pipe? [/quote]

The toilet is connected to a pipe that leads into the main city sewer line. What my plumber proposes is to connect it directly to the city sewer line, to prevent blockage from tree roots, etc., in the future; which we have had problems with in the past.

[quote user="Commonsense"] If your toilet previously worked well, then I doubt a pump is needed. The thing to do would be to have someone figure out whether the problem is inside your house or in the city's pipes. How long is it since the city was out to check their pipes and clean them out if necessary? [/quote]

The problem has nothing to do with the city's sewage system. The problem we have presently is the clean-up issue of the sewage that has accumilated under the house, in the crawl space.

[quote user="Commonsense"] As for the insurance agent, telling you "it's not covered" seems to be a popular past-time with them. Once again, I'd get some other opinions and then read your homeowner's insurance policy very carefully to determine for yourself if the problem (whatever it actually turns out to be) is covered. Then if you still get the run around keep demanding to speak to supervisors until you get someone who treats you with respect.

[/quote]
Thank you for the suggestion, Commonsense. I have since spoke with my insurance agent, and the agent's appraiser. Each one said the same thing. If it doesn't 'stucturally' effect the house, then it's not covered. In our state- Michigan- we can't get flood insurance- something to do with it being a peninsula state.A friend of mine explained it to me this way: when her house was hit by a tornado, a tree was torn up and it landed leaning across her house. Before the insurance company could fix her roof and siding, she had to pay someone to remove the tree. The insurance company wouldn't pay for that, because it wasn't part of the structure of the house.I still don't get the fact that our insurance company doesn't pay for the clean up of hazardess waste material in the crawl of the house; as it's making the occupants of the house sick. But, I guess that's just how they work.
I'm very dissapointed. It's going to cost us a fortune!

Answered 7 years ago by snarky

0
Votes

"Each one said the same thing. If it doesn't 'stucturally' effect [sic] the house, then it's not covered."

Every homeowner's policy is different. It doesn't sound to me like flood insurance is relevant here - and if you were told you can't get flood insurance then I'd double-check that statement because to the best of my knowledge unless you're actually living in a creek anyone can get flood insurance through the federal government, which manages it. The cost goes up with the risk of flood, just like anything else.

In the past, our homeowner's policy (which I think is fairly standard) read that if a sewage/water mess was caused by failure of any part of the structure of the house (not including acts of God such as tornados, earthquake, etc.) the policy covered the cleanup and repair. However, if a sewage problem was caused by a backup or malfunction of any part of the system the city was responsible for, the policy did not cover it. (That's why I suggested a second opinion and inquired about the city's cleanout history).

There was a backup on our common sewage line because (surprise surprise) the city hadn't been out to do routine inspection and root removal for many years. Our next door neighbor woke up to a basement full of raw sewage. We didn't get hit simply because he has a full basement and his property is lower than ours. After this happened we pulled out our policy and read the fine print like we should have done already, and found that if the problem was caused by backup of the city pipes we were not covered. One phone call to our insurance agent got us covered for that for about $10 extra per year. (How silly is it that it wasn't covered to begin with?)

I still wonder about the plumber telling you the "flange" or seal was gone. If that had been the case you would have had water - and worse - all over your floor and you would have had a bad smell there for quite a while. Seals don't disappear into thin air. Without any further information I strongly suspect what happened was that the pipe burst suddenly under the toilet and it would be easier and more profitable for your plumber if he bypasses the existing pipe and puts in a new one. If he can convince you you need a special pump all of a sudden he'd probably like that too. That's just a third-party opinion with inadequate facts. I hope you chase down the real cause of the problem, and that you and your family can return to having some peace of mind.



Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

0
Votes

Flood insurance coverage is via a separate policy or rider. Most home owner's insurance covers fire but not damage due to flood or eQuake

Subsequent to Hurricane Andrew, Federal legislation mandated flood insurance be available to all home owners (if memory serves, the annual premium was less than $350). Due to Katrina & Rita, those premiums were raised, and becuae of recent flood disaster events may increase..

It's impossible to comment further about the sewage problem, but a quick Google perusal seems to indicate a toilet "flange" is same as the wax ring many of us depend upon.

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

0
Votes

Thanks, Tessa. I'll get on my insurance agent about that. And yes, you are correct about the flange; but even if it didn't indicate it, the result is still the same. Sewage in my crawl space.

Answered 7 years ago by snarky

0
Votes

To obtain factual and current information about flood insurance, FloodSmart.gov. offers a helpful interactive link

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

0
Votes

"Subsequent to Hurricane Andrew, Federal legislation mandated flood insurance be available to all home owners"

Yes, and I believe the cap on that is $250,000, after which private insurers will take over. I don't know how we got into a discussion of flood insurance, though, since flood insurance is insurance for water damage. As I said I have a rider on my policy that covers against sewage whether it's due to our pipes or the city's, and the additional cost was minimal. The problem is you have to know to ask for it, and who's going to think of it? The only reason it occurred to us is our neighbor got a basement full of raw sewage and then found out he wasn't covered for it.

I still don't understand the nature of the original poster's situation here, do you? I think it really needs more on site investigation to determine the root cause. Several explanations given by "professionals" seem screwy, among them the "flange" issue, which is either the wax seal or the metal plate that bolts the toilet to the floor. In either case, the toilet was once working properly and then suddenly discharged raw sewage under the house. This couldn't have been a gradual thing, because the smell of raw sewage isn't something anyone misses. It sounds to me like a pipe burst under the house and none of the people who have been called out so far wants to deal with the issue head on, instead suggesting various bizarre and costly "repairs."

This is probably all too common a situation.

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

0
Votes

I thought I adressed these issues one by one in my earlier post with quotes. However, I'll attemp to answer again.

[quote user="Commonsense"] I still don't understand the nature of the original poster's situation here, do you?[/quote]

My problem was three-fold.

a) I had a leak and fixed it

b) contractor implied that I needed a sub pump; I have since decided that's unnesessary

c) was wondering why my insurance agent didnt cover it.

[quote user="Commonsense"]

I think it really needs more on site investigation to determine the root cause.[/quote]

The root cause was a pipe that burst, essentially wearing away the flange or ring, or whatever.

It has now been properly fixed.

It has nothing to do with my city's sewer lines.



[quote user="Commonsense"] Several explanations given by "professionals" seem screwy, among them the "flange" issue, which is either the wax seal or the metal plate that bolts the toilet to the floor. In either case, the toilet was once working properly and then suddenly discharged raw sewage under the house. This couldn't have been a gradual thing, because the smell of raw sewage isn't something anyone misses. It sounds to me like a pipe burst under the house and none of the people who have been called out so far wants to deal with the issue head on, instead suggesting various bizarre and costly "repairs."

This is probably all too common a situation.

[/quote]YES!

Answered 7 years ago by snarky




Related Questions


Terms Of Use
|
Privacy Policy