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Question DetailsAsked on 5/10/2011

What's a good flooring for a house with pets?

We're getting rid of our carpet and investigating ceramic tile. We have two dogs and two cats and are trying to decide what will wear the best. Any ideas?

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15 Answers

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I'm not sure I understand the question. If you're getting ceramic tile, then one tile is about as good as another. I'd make sure to have the grout sealed after it cures, so that any stains can be wiped up. If you don't have that done (and I believe it has to be done after the grout has completely cured, a matter of days) then stains and smells can and will permeate the grout and be difficult if not impossible to remove.

What kinds of messes do your pets make? We have several cats, and with the exception of an odd vomiting episode - immediately cleaned up from any surface with good results - there aren't any issues with our vinyl, wood, ceramic or carpeted floors.

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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As one whose entire home has been tile for 30+ years (currently switching to wood laminate) and the proud servant of 3 cats, I can offer a couple of suggestions. A good quality ceramic tile makes for durable flooring. Make sure that your choice is not slippery when wet and that your grout lines are as small as possible. We made two big mistakes many decades ago with the grout lines. We opted for quarter inch because it was popular at the time. Mistake number two was choosing antique white because our tiles were very light colored. Though we had our grout sealed, it darkened and wore away very quickly. After two applications, we gave up. With occasional hairball urps, even with quick cleaning, the tummy acid shows on the grout. The tile is soooooo easy to clean but the grout can be tricky. Happy tiling.

Answered 7 years ago by michelemabelle

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IMHO, your chioice of flooring should be based on the look you like and what you are willing to maintain. also the size & activity level of your dogs. Laminate is somewhat "softer" and defintely warmer than tile.

Last year we had a flood; 10 yr old "first generation" Pego lamimate had withstood giant dogs and largert kids! When insurance company replaced the existing lamimate with another brand's latest product, the installer scrached it when relocating appliances..

A reputable dog breeder friend chose tile because when grout is sealed, it can be sanitized.

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

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We have laminate flooring in our livingroom and all of our bedrooms. Overall it's good--easy to clean and attractive. It DOES scratch easily though. Make sure you put felt on the bottom of all furniture legs, etc to minimize the scratches. Vacuuming and occasional mopping are all the cleaning laminate requires.

Answered 7 years ago by cavyslave

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I"ve had laminate flooring in the past, and it looks fine unless it's right next to real wood flooring. It also does scratch, but the major issue for me - and increasingly for others - is how environmentally friendly flooring materials are. Laminate is certainly one of the least desirable flooring materials from that perspective, due both to the ingredients of the material and the manufacturing process. Ceramic tile can be much more acceptable in that regard, bearing in mind that the other elements of installation - mastic, grout, etc. - need to be just as environmentally responsible. Carpet - especially the stain-resistant synthetic fibers - is one of the worst from that viewpoint. There are so many issues to consider with any purchase these days.

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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Choosing a "green" product requires analysis. Last year 3 retailers said WilsonArt is the only laiminate (flooring) currently manufactured in the USA & other laminates are manufactured in 2nd-3rd world countries where there are no ecological friendly regulations.

When choosing carpet, most homeowners want a stain resistent carpet - stain resistent carpet is made from petroleum; requires petroleum to manufacture, deliver and install, & gives off gasses that can be harmful to our health. sure is easier to maintain than wool [6]

Me thinks if I were having a new home built, walls would be "rammed earth" or "straw" with solar collectors on the roof and maybe a well powered by a windmill

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

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"Me thinks if I were having a new home built, walls would be "rammed earth" or "straw"". . .then get used to living with bugs

"with solar collectors on the roof" That only solves part of your energy needs

"and maybe a well powered by a windmill" great as long as the wind blows, and as long as the local farmer doesn't pour chemicals into the earth, the way farmers do.

There is no easy answer.

As for laminate flooring, it's not a question of "ecological friendly regulations," since the US has none of those either. Laminate flooring just isn't ecologically friendly period. In regard to flooring options, ceramic tile, natural stone and old-fashioned linoleum seem to be pretty good - bearing in mind that products used in their installation might be suspect.

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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those who think rammed earth or straw homes equals living with bugs are misinformed. today those homes are costly to construct but less expensive to maintain, heat or cool.

FYI, a historical building constructed via rammed earth in Fiddletown, Amador County, CA ~ a hundred plus years later, still standing & no bugs! reason it came to mind is cause local news showcased a newer spacious country home = no AC needed x 3 years. building homes with straw is not a new concept, those who can afford it are building them in AZ, giggle [:D] sorta like the sod houses settlers built in the midwest and adobe dwellings in the southwest

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

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I'm having a little problem with the new laminate floors already. We put the self-stick felt pads on everything as directed. The breakfast room chairs, however, are moved in and out many times a day as it has also become central station for bill paying, etc. as well as meals. Anyhow, the pads quickly came off. My husband bought more at Home Depot and applied a small dab of wood glue for staying power. Less than a week later, we have adhesive spots all over the laminate. I've cleaned it up with a quick rub of my nail polish remover grade acetone but I can't think that's too good for the floor. Also, it's going to become another daily chore. Does anyone have any ideas???????

Answered 7 years ago by michelemabelle

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I've had pergo for years and love it (both the hard wood and tile looking pergo).....have no problems with scratches....that's with 3 dogs and at one time had 2 cats (one of my dogs is a 105 pound malamute).

As far as wanting to protect an area that has high volume, like around the table with chairs, they make outdoor rugs that are stylish while being extremely durable and easy to clean .....go to HGTV.com and do a search.


Answered 7 years ago by muddogz3

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Good to know that you haven't had scratch problems as we have 3 cats. I considered the area rug but just got rid of ours when we changed from tile to wood laminate and am not too keen on replacing it. We talked to the installer yesterday who said it was okay to use the nylon chair glides so we'll try them out.

Answered 7 years ago by michelemabelle

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I had laminate in my last home and it held up well -- except. If you don't clean up the puddle when it happens, it will cause the backing to separate from the surface and the edges curl. So as long as liquid doesn't sit, it's great!

Answered 7 years ago by Sarge

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"Does anyone have any ideas???????" Yeah, don't let your husband use wood glue anymore. Seriously though, a good laminate should not scratch unless there's an actual metal projection scraping against it. I would not suggest using acetone on the floor again. Next time - if there is a next time - try mineral oil or vinegar, both of which are envronmentally friendly. I hope the silicone pads don't make the chairs slip around too much, and I hope they aren't attractive to any pets you have. I have a plastic-eating cat who wouldn't let a silicone pad exist in the house for more than five seconds. . . . .

Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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The first generation Pergo (mfg in Europe) was nearly no scratch; water was a problem. lol, I remember putting weights on a raised portion. Unfortunately after a flood the insurance replaced it = eeek, the old Pergo had dried out & looked good but too late!

Of the new laminates, I was told by more than one supplier that only WilsonArt is mfg in the US - it scratches much more easily but not because a 130# dog was allowed to run in with muddy feet! (cannot picture a cat scratching it)

SIGH! wish I still had my old Pergo and my 130# dog

Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

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I wish you had your old Pergo and 130 lb. dog too. Especially the dog. That's sad.

Answered 7 years ago by michelemabelle




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