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Question DetailsAsked on 5/22/2011

What are the pros and cons of granite and quartz countertops?

I plan to replace my tile countertops with either granite or a quartz synthetic such as Silestone.

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    7 Answers

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    What Old Grouch said [:D] Also, if you've found someone who's familiar with formica and is willing to install it, grab him tight and hold on! Formica is a lovely material that is cheap, easy to install, extremely durable and makes good sense all around. It also comes in lots of yummy patterns. But many people these days have jumped onto the only-granite-will-do bandwagon, and it's hard to find anyone who will even talk about doing formical installation. Granite is heavy, hugely expensive, freezing cold all the time, hard to work with, brittle, and shows stains horribly. I can't think of a much worse substance for a countertop than something with those characteristics, and yet people are wetting their pants for granite. I predict in ten years anyone seeing a kitchen for the first time is going to say "Oh god, more granite, ecch!" But that's neither here nor there.

    If you are happy with the recommendations he got on Angie's List, give him a try. Do you have a smaller project you could try him out on first, just to see if he shows up on time, etc?



    Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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    Hi. I know just a little bit about countertops as I have a relative in the business who does commercial design. Granite is good because you can place things directly from the stove or oven onto the surface. As it is a natural product, the slabs won't be a perfect match in most instances. In my opinion, that only adds to the beauty of it. It does require a cleaning and sealer about every two years as it's porous. That's not a big deal and you can do it yourself if you have a spare hour. Silestone is also good as setting hot things on it apply as well. The only drawback is that the seams are somewhat visible. Corian is also a good product but you cannot place hot things on the surface. It is a very "clean" look as no seams are visible. Both Silestone and Corian need to be buffed out and polished every 3 or 4 years and look brand new when professionally done. Good luck on your kitchen project.

    Answered 7 years ago by michelemabelle

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    LauraZ research brands. talk with folk who live with a surface you are considering; analyze * weigh the pros and cons of each. There are few if any maintenance free surfaces.. consider your life what you can afford and maintain.

    Personally, I dislike only one thing about my kitchen remodel: tile & sandy grout is impossible to keep clean unless windows are never opened/ dust & dirt accumulates. A continuous surface may have been a better choice for MY lifee

    Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

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    Adeendum: My cousin and DD#1 chose to have Corian installed for their kitchens re-do. DD#2 purchased an upscale home with granite counters in the ktichen (boring). Yesterday I saw a upscale kitchen where the owners chose Quartz and another with beautiful green "granite"

    I haven't lived with any of the above and wish I could find a something to finally seal "new age" grout! right now "Formica" sounds good since my 50's bathroom tile bath has never been a problem[

    Answered 7 years ago by tessa89

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    Tessa89 -- we have tile that we installed ourselves 14 years ago. I hate the maintenance of the grout. Despite clearning and sealing it still manages to look dirty. I love that we can put hot pans on it without fear. We also have the lip of the tile that comes up slightly higher around the edges which prevents lots of messy spills! But, we're ready to try something else that is less maintenance. I guess we are just very messy cooks!

    Answered 7 years ago by lauraz

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    Laura,

    In regard to dirty-looking grout, have you tried putting a paper towel over the grout and then soaking the paper towel with a solution of half bleach, half water and letting it sit there for about a half hour? I've used that to bleach grout in the past, with great results.

    Answered 7 years ago by Commonsense

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    Lauraz, Your kitchen tile is about the same age as mine when porous (sandy) grout was the norm. What's worked best for me is to mop up spills quickly. A solution of bleach/water usually takes care of residual stains, but the tile setter said over time bleach will compromise grout. I've sealed it multiple times with little success (including the plastic yellow bottle with green print). Grasping at straws I recently purchased something on the Q home shopping network and can only hope I'll have more sucess....

    [6] maybe we should consult the HGTV & DIY stars! ask if using bleach to whiten the grout before applying caulk will offer a lasting stain barrier

    Answered 7 years ago by tessa89




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