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Question DetailsAsked on 9/4/2013

What is a reasonable cost for installing a new floor flange and reseating a toilet?

My toilet was leaking around the base. The plumber said that a new floor flange had to be installed. Then the toilet was re-installed on the new floor flange.

I was billed $535. Is this considerd a a resonable charge. I believe it at least over $100 too much.

Thanks,

Richard

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4 Answers

1
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OK - are you talking a floor flange (a metal plate the toilet bolts down to) or the wax ring that acts as a gasket between the flange and the toilet ?

To replace the wax ring and reinstall the toilet would usually be about $100 - maybe $150 in large cities and high-cost areas - normally a minimum visit charge plus about $5 for the wax ring.

If the flange was corroded so bad it was not holding the mounting bolts, then the cost would depend on how much trouble it was to replace. If it turned right off, with or without the nipple (short piece of pipe it mounts to) then the cost would have been little more than just replacing the wax ring - maybe $10-20 more for the parts. However, if he had to open up the ceiling below or go into the basement or whatever and break it free from there, that would have been maybe an extra half hour to hour.

Not having seen what it took to fix it, and what pipes may have broken when he tried to break it free, I would be reluctant to bad-mouth the plumber, but normally replacing the flange (and wax ring) would be a $250-300, 2 hour range job, so yours is definitely over the norm, to say the least. Beyond that, one would have to know exactly what had to be done (or how long it took) to say if it was "fair" or not.

I presume in all this there was no drywall repair and painting involved in the $535 - if that was included to repair the hole he cut, then you are getting into the reasonable range - at least $400+.

Answered 3 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

The toilet and flange our mounted on a concrete foundation. Would this involve clearing concrete around the sewer pipe to possibly repair the pipe to accept a new floor flange?

Answered 3 years ago by Guest_9681878

0
Votes

OK - I totally spaced on the possibility of it being in a slab.

It definitely involved some concrete removal, in all likelihood - without knowing what he took out hard to tell, but if he had to cut through the concrete to remove the flange and the first piece of pipe then you are in the reasonable price range. If the flange was badly corroded by some leakage, then it is quite possible one of two things happened - the first piece of pipe below it was corrroded too so he replaced it as well, or if you sewer pipe is plastic a corroded flange can come off so hard that you can break the plastic pipe below it, so he might have had to dig out more than a little concrete to get room to cleanly cut that off and put on another piece of plastic pipe, then the nipple and flange. If he was working at this for 4 hours or so or you saw him mixing grout to repair the floor, that is probably what the case was.

This is one of those cases where at first blush the price seems too high by quite a bit, but if you look into it in depth there may be a perfectly legitimate explanation. Can't say more than that without pictures of what the situation was - unless he was in and out in an hour or two I would assume this was legit and curse your luck that it happened in a basement toilet.

Answered 3 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

Sounds reasonable considering the concrete.

However replacing the flange yourself is an easy job.

I recently used the Culwell Flange to replace the flanges in all of my bathrooms.

It seals to the floor.

Has anyone used this flange?

I found it on Amazon, but they have a website www.culwellflange.com

Answered 1 year ago by mandylynnp76




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