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Question DetailsAsked on 6/28/2015

Where to get gloves for handling cactus pears?

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2 Answers

0
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Depending on how tightly you are grabbing them and for what purpose - I do wonder what you are doing with the pears. If for cutting them off the plant, I would make a slit scoop shaped like a bailer or nut scoop that fits around the base of the pear (maybe made out of a cut down old gallon milk bottle or 2 liter soda bottle) that you can slip in around the base of the pear while you cut it off with shears or knife so it drops into the plastic scoop, then dump from there into carrying container every half dozen to dozen pears. Then you only need gloves heavy enough to guard against sporadic contact with the cactus blade spines, which very heavy leather ranch or welding gloves/guantlets should handle, and probably mechanic's kevlar gloves to hold the pear while plucking spines from it, if you do that as part of preparation for sale or use in wine making or whatever you are using them for.



I would get long gauntlet type heavy weight leather gloves if reaching well into the plants commonly, along with wrap-around (not front only) leather chaps and high-top heavy leather boots to protect from spines and snakes/scorpions/gila monsters/spiders who like to hide in/under cactus plants. If lighter duty plucking or holding while extracting spines, perhaps regular kevlar mechanics gloves would work.



Best places to find heavy gloves like this - true hardware stores, feed and tack stores (horse and cattle supply sources - commonly called fencing gloves), Army and Navy surplus and working man Carhartt and similar clothing type stores, and for cheapest (though might have to try a couple to find particular type that work for you) probably Amazon or Harbor Freight Tools. I have found the almost elbow-length flannel-lined split-leather welding gauntlets from Harbor Freight to be very penetration resistant but still moderately flexible - enough to use field tools but not precision ones - more like a heavy leather work glove than a truly molten metal resistant welding glove. Kevlar ones are quite a bit more flexible and easy to work in, but might let spines through the micro holes in the kevlar fabric easier, though there are metal armored kevlar ones for people working with heavy duty sharp metal. The heavy duty leather finger and palm or full-leather yard work or welding gauntlets are generally more resistant to penetration, but quite stiff till well broken in so hard to work in, and clumsy to hold small things with.



Medical supply places and some pharmacies have kevlar armored gloves for medical personnel constantly working with sharps like scalpels and needles and such that are much more flexible - but don't know how they would stand up in continual field use.



Police/security supply places also have gloves like TurtleSkin that are designed to protect against penetration by sharps, and are quite flexible - enough so to be able to handle a pen, computer, and gun with - but again I don't know how long they would last in continual sharps use. Cost about $50-100 depending on model - some at Amazon and online police equipment supply outlets also.



Veterinary supply places also have armored kevlar gauntlets for handling cats and similar sharp-toothed and clawed patients that are heavy duty, but likely to pretty pricey - probably about $50/pair as opposed to $15-20 or so for heavy welding or mechanics gloves at discount place.



I would try googling at blogs maintained by people who pick cactus pears and see what they use.

Answered 2 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

Depending on how tightly you are grabbing them and for what purpose - I do wonder what you are doing with the pears. If for cutting them off the plant, I would make a slit scoop shaped like a bailer or nut scoop that fits around the base of the pear (maybe made out of a cut down old gallon milk bottle or 2 liter soda bottle) that you can slip in around the base of the pear while you cut it off with shears or knife so it drops into the plastic scoop, then dump from there into carrying container every half dozen to dozen pears. Then you only need gloves heavy enough to guard against sporadic contact with the cactus blade spines, which very heavy leather ranch or welding gloves/guantlets should handle, and probably mechanic's kevlar gloves to hold the pear while plucking spines from it, if you do that as part of preparation for sale or use in wine making or whatever you are using them for.


I would get long gauntlet type heavy weight leather gloves if reaching well into the plants commonly, along with wrap-around (not front only) leather chaps and high-top heavy leather boots to protect from spines and snakes/scorpions/gila monsters/spiders who like to hide in/under cactus plants. If lighter duty plucking or holding while extracting spines, perhaps regular kevlar mechanics gloves would work.


Best places to find heavy gloves like this - true hardware stores, feed and tack stores (horse and cattle supply sources - commonly called fencing gloves), Army and Navy surplus and working man Carhartt and similar clothing type stores, and for cheapest (though might have to try a couple to find particular type that work for you) probably Amazon or Harbor Freight Tools. I have found the almost elbow-length flannel-lined split-leather welding gauntlets from Harbor Freight to be very penetration resistant but still moderately flexible - enough to use field tools but not precision ones - more like a heavy leather work glove than a truly molten metal resistant welding glove. Kevlar ones are quite a bit more flexible and easy to work in, but might let spines through the micro holes in the kevlar fabric easier, though there are metal armored kevlar ones for people working with heavy duty sharp metal. The heavy duty leather finger and palm or full-leather yard work or welding gauntlets are generally more resistant to penetration, but quite stiff till well broken in so hard to work in, and clumsy to hold small things with.


Medical supply places and some pharmacies have kevlar armored gloves for medical personnel constantly working with sharps like scalpels and needles and such that are much more flexible - but don't know how they would stand up in continual field use.


Police/security supply places also have gloves like TurtleSkin that are designed to protect against penetration by sharps, and are quite flexible - enough so to be able to handle a pen, computer, and gun with - but again I don't know how long they would last in continual sharps use. Cost about $50-100 depending on model - some at Amazon and online police equipment supply outlets also.


Veterinary supply places also have armored kevlar gauntlets for handling cats and similar sharp-toothed and clawed patients that are heavy duty, but likely to pretty pricey - probably about $50/pair as opposed to $15-20 or so for heavy welding or mechanics gloves at discount place.


I would try googling at blogs maintained by people who pick cactus pears and see what they use.

Answered 2 years ago by LCD




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