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Question DetailsAsked on 1/30/2017

does pex pipe make water taste bad

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To many people yes - some people like me taste it forever, some say it is objectionable for 2-3 weeks of use, then noticeable for another couple to few months and after that not soemthing they notice - either because it has reduced in concentration enough, or because they have gotten used to it. Most people notice it fairly strongly in new PEX piping, at least.


And note that a normal point-of-use (like t kitchen sink) filtration system will normally NOT remove that taste - takes an activated carbon filter or chemical-resistant reverse osmosis system to do that. [Normal RO membranes are known to have degraded and degraded from the chemicals leaching out of PEX and similar "soft" plastic pipes.]


The concentration of course depends on how long it has sat and outgassed chemicals to the water - so will be strongest in morning after a night of little or no use, and least moticeable after substantial water has been run through it.


Personally, while the taste thing is an individual thing and might or might not be a big issue to you, my greater concern would be about leaks, because connection failures and PEX leakage/splitting/cracking are still occurring with the newer products, not just the ones installed at the peak of the PEX problems a half-decade to decade or so ago.


It is also susceptible to degradation of heating systems when used in hot-water circulating systems, and if used outdoors (please don't) and it passes through pesticide or petroleum or other chemical -contaminated soil, it can pick those up and pass them into the house water.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD




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