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Question DetailsAsked on 1/24/2017

how much will it cost to push the fireplace to be flush with wall ?

The fireplace in the family room is protruding too much inside. I want to make this fireplace flush with the wall. How much this project cost ? Is this even doable ?

http://imgur.com/a/WTgKt

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7 Answers

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Hi,

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Answered 1 year ago by Member Services

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I just added my subscription. How would i get an answer now ?

Answered 1 year ago by MES

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Hi Chris


I just added my subscription. How would i get an answer now ?


Thanks

Answered 1 year ago by MES

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Hi Chris


I went in and added my subscriptions. Would it be possible to answer now or do i have to do anything else ?


Thanks

Answered 1 year ago by MES

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You would have to get bids from remodeling contractors - or a Chimney/Fireplace contractor experienced in modifying fireplaces.


If this is a true stone or brick full-chimney fireplace, you are talking a MAJOR modification - I would be surprised if you got it for less than a couple or a few thousand $ minimum probably $3000 plus if there is an upstairs fireplace above it on the same chimney, or the chimney is multi-flue.


If this is a ready-set type fireplace - an outdoor chase (usually sided like the rest of the house) up the outside of the house with the usually double-wall metal stainless steel pipe flue inside it, then you might get it for around $1000-2000 - maybe, but commonly not. Either of these is pretty significant operation, because you will either the do a major reconfiguration of the firebox/smokebox area (the burning area and the area right above the damper which necks down to the chimney flue) or kinking the flue above the smokebox, and if true stone or brick addition to the chimney to its base probably too, to support the change in position of the load.


And of course, if it has a full stone or brick mantle area and hearth, that adds to cost too.


If a gas fireplace or wood stove with direct venting flue pipe right through the wall, or exposed exterior metal pipe flue, then more readily doable - more a case of maybe creating a "door opening" with header for it to fit in, with likely a couple feet to maybe 4 feet of extension or bumpout of the wall to contain the fireplace/stove, and relocating the flue or putting a bend into it if a vertical flue pipe up the wall.


Note that in almost any case, unless a very shallow gas insert type fireplace, it is going to result in a bumpout on the outside of the house - a place where it will stick out from the existing siding, usually as a rectangular bumpout full-house height, resided with matching siding - or matching brick or stone if full chimney, so it will change the appearance of the house a bit - and depending on chimney location, if in a close quarters row house or zero lot line type situation, might not be allowed by zoning regulations - so be sure that is checked on as well as building code compliance.


Depending on how much house structure modification is involved, or structural changes needed in the chimney, you will likely plans for the work from an architect or structural engineer - another $500-1500 commonly depending on how much it changes the structure and whether any significant structural members are being affected - or if the chimney portion being pushed back supports structural members, which can drive both engineering and construction costs up into the maybe doubled price range.


If the hearth is the major problem space-wise, depending on building code locale, in most areas you need a hearth depth (stickout) of 16" in front of the fireplace itself, and 8 inches minimum to each side of the fireplace opening, to catch embers and also to hold people back from sticking hands into the fire or glass doors or getting skin / clothes close enough to be burned. In a few code areas however, putting in a full-coverage protective "cool-touch" screen in front (sticking out at least 4-8 inches from the firebox face) is allowed to replace the hearth - in combination with fireproof flooring or permanently installed fireproof hearth mat for the 16" stickout, though that can be at the same elevation as the room flooring, so you can sometimes regain about half the hearth area without moving the firebox/fireplace itself.


BTW - bear in mind if pushing it all back, you will need to consider how you are going to handle the new section of expsoed flooring - maybe a foot and a half to two feet deep by maybe 5-10 feet wide, because finding exactly matching flooring is likely to be tough. You can put in different flooring of course as an accent, a medallion design, or just fill it in with fireproof hearth flooring, if that is allowed.


So - for full-height true brick/stone fireplace and chimney, I would start thinking in the $10,000 budget range and hope you can get it down a fair amount from there, or if a wood stove or fireplace insert type (the type typically installed as add-in units, without a full pre-existing chimney) I would budget $5000 range and hope it can be less than that.


This all assumes normal home construction (excluding all-concrete), and that the fireplace is more or less normal sized (maybe 5-6 feet wide hearth and mantle), not a gigantic lodge size that can handle a big chunk of tree trunk. Major modifications on that type can easily run $10,000 or more because commonly the chimney, especially if made of large stone, has to be torn down to the area being modified and rebuilt from there.


I would run it by a few chimney/fireplace contractors and see what they say without actually doing a bid yet, then if real easy wood stove type ask for bids, or if involving structural changes talk to an architect about plans to then give to several bidders to bid on.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD

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Hi,

This is Chris in Member Care. I'm happy to help!

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Answered 1 year ago by Member Services

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One option I did not mention - there are heat-resistant glass "doors" for fireplaces that are multi-layered with special glass, so the outer glass layer and frame is not too hot to touch when the fireplace is in use - designed for fireplaces in public places like hotels and resataurants and such, so available generally only from commercial restaurant and hotel fixture suppliers. It might be your fireplace can be fitted with one to allow elimination of the hearth stickout entirely - or maybe fitted that way plus fireproof flooring or hearth mat in front (not required if gas fireplace rather than solid-fuel burning), which might freeup pretty much most or all of your floor space WITHOUT pushing the fireplace itself back. Might only stick out as far as the existing face of the fireplace, say - maybe a few inches which might be acceptable versus spending a ton of money pushing it flush to the wall to gain only a few inches of floor space.


Another similar option I don't think I mentioned - possibly eliminating hearth and using heat-resistant glass or screening on the fireplace, and changing current wood-burning fireplace to gas - to eliminate the need for a hearth.


And of course one others sometimes used in restaurants and hotels and such to eliminate safety hazards and maintenance, if you are after just the appearance of a fire - converting the fireplace (after taking off hearth and maybe mantle to gain space) with a totally fake fireplace, which are called electric fireplaces - google that phrase for images and info. There are fairly realistic looking electric fireplaces which are actually just an image or lights and fake flame behind glass - some even have an electric heater with hot air blower or a radiant heater built into them so you not only "see" but also "feel" the heat from the "fireplace" - those of course are not "energy efficient" in most areas, but for occasional "recreational" use can be a good deal andlook fairly realistic with none of the heat losses or dirt of a real fireplace.

Answered 1 year ago by LCD




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