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Question DetailsAsked on 7/7/2016

how to secure plastic runners so they don't roll up.

Our home is carpeted but we are using plastic runners on the main traffic flow from bedrooms, through living room and ending in the kitchen. Our oldest dog will be 15 in a couple of months and this allows us to have easy clean ups on those times he can't make it outside fast enough. Which it's working great for that. But the runners move, roll up and are a tripping hazard for me. I have epilepsy and nerve damage. I have to use my walker indoors to prevent me from falling.Is there any way to secure it? Our carpet is old with little to no nap left. Than you for your help.

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Common ways to prevent the sliding of the runner - though of course all but first option below mean you have to unhook or unscrew something to take the runner up, like if there is leakage under the edges


1) buy runners with the spiky prongs on the back side (like most chair mats for use on carpeting have) - prevents the sliding entirely. Generally runners for use on carpet have the anti-slip "spikes", ones for hard surface floors do not. Image of what I am talking about here - click on fourth of four photos on this page to see the "spikes" -


https://www.floormats.com/clear-vinyl...


2) use double-sided carpet tape, though obviously over the long run that slightly damages the carpet underneath and can make for gummy spots when the runner is pulled up, though normally "shaving" the carpet to remove those stuck-on spots will solve that on shag carpet (ruins loop-topped or berber carpet). Also, if runner is clear, the tape shows through the runner, though done neatly along the edges it just looks like a border.


4) use runner clips - mechanical clips that slip over and grip the edges of the runner, and are screwed into the subfloor or jab into the underlying carpet like hatpins. Available a few places on the web including Amazon where you can see a few examples, mostly a carpet dealer item.


5) put conventional metal transition strips at the ends to prevent slipping and end curling, same as you do for carpet to solid flooring transitions.


6) use flat dome head screws with fender washers installed through the runner (atleast 1/2-3/4" from edge to avoid splitting) at intervals to tie it down, obviously stretching it out well as you go to prevent bunching along the run


To prevent rolling/edge curling only:


1) for corner curling there are rigid stick-on corner reinforcers (Amazon has 2 examples I found) to hold the corner flat


2) clips or screws or double sided tape as above


3) if the whole thing is trying to roll up, reroll it - tape it up, roll it moderately tight (without cracking it, so maybe 2-3 foot diameter roll depending on stiffness) and tie or tape it that way for several days to put in a "downward" curl memory in the plastic - then untie and roll out - the ends will not try to dig into the carpet rather than curl up. May have to do this every month or few or combine with clips or tape at the ends because walking on it tends to make the runner embed in the carpet, curling up the ends and edges.


Some of the above solutions a Handyman could do, the carpet clips he could also do but might need a bit of searching around to find them so carpet installer might be better for that. Carpet installer could do any of these solutions.


Another option entirely if the runners turn out to not cut it - buy (or rent if expected to be shorter-term need) the long rubber (with or without carpet surface) entry runners like many grocery stores and hotels and convention centers and stadiums and such use. Many commercial restaurant and linen supply companies carry them, and the linen supply companies rent them by the month and will come and pick up at intervals and clean them (actually they take away the ones you have and replace immediately with clean ones unless special color/design - if special color or design then take and clean and bring back in a day or two). A few carpet cleaning companies rent these too - some take away to clean, some clean in-place periodically. The thin carpet-covered ones (though means a bit of cleanup after each dog accident) might also help if the dog develops footing issues as it ages, because the clear plastic runners can be pretty poor footing (potentially for you and the dog).

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On the dog - especially at night - if you have a dog door and fenced back yard (a VERY nice thing to do for an older dog so it does not have to come wake you up to go out), start putting it's bed close to the dog door so whenever it is sleeping and needs to go, it just jumps up and blasts out the door - can limit almost all accidents to the deck or porch at worst. Also works well for dogs with digestive or reflex or medicine regurgitation issues causing it to throw up unexpectedly at times - they can commonly make it 5-10 feet to the dog door, not all the way down the hall from the bedroom. When moving the bed you may have to sleep on the couch nearby for a couple of nights to get it comfortable with sleeping there - of course easier to make this move if it just sleeps in your bedroom, not on your bed, but better to transition it now than when it starts having accidents on your bedding.


And of course if it is having accidents, hopefully you have checked with its vet about whether this is old age and untreatable or some treatable condition. Commonly they can help with such conditions even if not cure them, and of course this can be a symptom of kidney problems and such too, if you have not talked to the vet about it occurring.

Answered 2 years ago by LCD




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