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Question DetailsAsked on 3/29/2018

my at-grade garage slab seeps water before and during heavy rain, who do I call? Bits of the floor are detaching.

I plan to sell in the next few years, so I don't want to go crazy on repair bills.

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Answered 8 months ago by LCD

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Angies List's computer stripped out the paragraph breaks again and ran it all together - but you can still click on the individual http links, which I have separated with --- --- breaks.

Answered 8 months ago by LCD

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No. My garage seeps water BEFORE it rains. Sometimes 48 hours previous to rain. Why?

Answered 8 months ago by PatH

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Angies List computer is taking out paragraph breaks again - everywhere the is a --- --- indicates where a paragraph break should be.

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OK - sorry. Assuming you are not next to a dammed waterway or lake which has its level edjusted to accomodate more storage before a rainfall (usually only done before MAJOR forecasted storms, and seasonally before rainy seaon), I can only think of two reasons.

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1) that the garage floor is passing a lot of moisture through it all the time (from an underslab or nearby leak or high water table) but the moisture normally evaporates as fast as it wicks in so you have a relatively dry floor (though probably still damp under the flooring), and as a storm moves in the higher humidity reduces the evaporation so you then have a "wet" rather than "damp" floor, causing flooring separation. ------ If this is the case, the areas where it seeps or is visibly wet would give an indication of where the source water is more or less prevalent - especially if in patches or as fingers or blobs of wetness intruding from one side. ------ 2) alternatively, could be you have a high water table, and the lower barometric pressure which almost always precedes and accompanies rain storms (dropping barometer) reduces the overlying air pressure on the water table just enough that it goes from lying far enough below the slab to not wet it, to coming up to the slab or close enough that it saturates the slab and then seeps water. The water level can fluctuate up to a foot or so during normal weather variations, as much as about 2-3 feet in major record-level high pressure events or hurricanes/tornadoes respectively. Could be your water table coincidentally is close enough to the slab level that weather events make the difference between the slab keeping up with water transmission through the slab by evaporation, and not being able to keep up so it gets visibly wet. ------ A bit of digging around the perimeter of the garage a couple of feet deep (watch out for utility lines) should tell you if you have high water level all around the garage - if not or only one place, more likely to be from a water leak (water pipe, sewer pipe, or high water from septic field leachate moving toward garage rather than soaking in) than from high water table. For the before-storm effect, I would be MUCH more inclined to believe it is high water table - natural or local from leach field. ------ If so, then putting in a gravel or french pipe drain around the garage might be needed to drain the water down to a lower level, with the drain exiting at a low enough level to keep the garage area dryer.------ ====== You don't say what kind of flooring you have - unusual to have flooring (other than concrete or coated concrete) in a garage. Certainly, assuming an underlying concrete slab (as opposed to wood), the cheapest repair (if you do anything more than just removing the flooring as it loosens up) would be to remove it and grind down to bare concrete and seal the concrete (which would not stop the water, just needed to reduce dusting). Of course, if the base under the flooring is wood, you likely have a major rot issue on your hands. ------ If you have no flooring and you just mean the concrete is exfoliating - popouts forming in the concrete - those are likely due to either reactive or soluble aggregate in the concrete, or the reinforcing (usually 4x4 or 6x6" grid mesh) rusting and popping out surface pieces as the rust expands as it forms. If that is the case, solving the water source would be the first measure, then either patching the concrete or, for better appearance, putting on a thin epoxy concrete overlay. ------ Cheapest of course would be to DIY periodically as needed - wash the floor to remove dirt and dust, then use an epoxy modified concrete driveway skim coat and popout patch material (not "concrete patch" because you are talking thin popouts, so you want a patch without coarse aggregate). Available in volumes as small as 1# bags and up to 60# bags (about 1/2 cubic foot yield) which you mix with water to muffin or thick waffle mix consistency and trowel into place to fill the popouts. Does not stop the popping out, just a "bandaid" repair for the popouts as they occur. ------ Could do any fix now and as needed, or leave it till you are ready to lisst and then either sell it as-is with regards to the floor condition, or have it fixed with an overlay then to give a nice new appearance. ------ Concrete Repair and Placement (or something real close to that) is the Search the List category for the concrete repair if you don't want to do it yourself.

Answered 8 months ago by LCD




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