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Question DetailsAsked on 1/1/2018

spickets humming kitchen

tonight our kitchen spigots
started humming and we don't know why or what to do about

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3 Answers

0
Votes

Here is a link to a similar question with answer - was about bathroom, but same principles:

http://answers.angieslist.com/there-h... Things to do to track this down: 1) check shutoff valves and piping under sink to be sure there is no leakage - ditto under diswhwasher. It only takes a very tiny leak to make a pretty loud noise - sometimes so small you cannot evenb see the spray, only able to detect it by a wet spot or puddle, or by running your hand near the pipe and feel the extremely fine vaporized mist coming out of a pinhole leak. That type of leak most common at connections, though can occur anywhere in the piping in metal pipe due to corrosion pitting forming a pinhole leak. 2) try adjusting the faucet valve(s) position a touch - especially with single-handle faucets, sometimes just a tiny movement up and down or to one side can shut off a tiny leak bypassing the seals. (Can also be a sign, if it happens often or repeatedly, that the gaskets/seals in the faucet are getting old and starting to leak). Commonly associated with a slow drip from the faucet. 3) sometimes the spray nozzle valve will leak just a touch, making a chattering or humming sound - exercise the handle on the spray nozzle if you have one and see if that affects it. 4) if your water pressure is running high (seems to be coming out of faucet faster/more forcefully than usual), then could be the local water pressure has been cranked up a bit because of New Years demand (common during Bowl games especially) or to compensate for a broken or leaking frozen pipe in the water system, or to increase pressure to firefighters fighting a major fire in your area. If on well, could also mean the pressure shutoff controller on the pump is not working right, so it is pressuring your system up to more than the normal 30-60 psi (assuming wellhead and house are at roughly same elevation). 5) a failing pressure regulator, if you house has one, can also cause humming or screeching or chatter at valves and faucets. For about $10-15 you can get a screw-on hose fitting pressure gauge (should read to 100 psi or more) which you can screw onto a hose bib or the drain valve on the water heater or laundry room faucet or such to check your indoor pressure. Generally, 35 some to 50 is considered a good pressure (static pressure - when no water is being used) to give you adequate operating pressure without over-stressing the system and appliances. Over 60 is discouraged, especially in older piping, and over 70 is in the trouble range where you can expect to start seeing possible failures or leaks. 6) if the sound occurs at ALL faucets, then an "instant hot water" circulating pump on the hot water piping, or a steam/hot water boiler circulating pump humming (which is not unusual nor, if not loud or screechy, necessarily a sign of a problem) is commonly the cause. Also a failing heat pump mounted on top of a high-efficiency water heater can do this. 7) ditto if occcurring at all hot faucets, a leaking overtemp/overpressure valve on the hot water heater (or boiler) can put a howl or hum through the pipes. Check the external drain pipe coming from the valve at the top-side of the water heater to see if water is dripping out of it. During overpressure events in the boiler/heater it can bleed off a bit of water causing a hum or screech - also as they get old they sometimes start bleeding just enough water to cause a sharp sound as a tiny amount of water gets past the seal. 8) some water softeners/filter sysstems have an audible alarm generated by water flow to tell you when the unit needs salt, or when the filter needs changing 9) if you have an under-sink filtration or distillation unit, check that is not the source of the noise - a service alarm, or a leak, etc. 10) if those do not track it down or stop it, then putting your ear to pipes or better yet, using a stethoscope (about $10 at pharmacy department in box store), tracking the sound along the pipes to where it is loudest can pin it down. IF these did not help you tie it down, then Plumbing is the Search the List category for you to use to find a well-rated and reviewed plumber to come check it out and fix it.

Answered 10 months ago by LCD

0
Votes

OK - I'll try ONE MORE TIME to get it to leave the paragraph breaks in - the ... 's are where the paragraph breaks should be, if it scrunches the text all together again:
...
...
Here is a link to a similar question with answer - was about bathroom, but same principles:
...
...
http://answers.angieslist.com/there-h...
...
...
Things to do to track this down:
...
...
1) check shutoff valves and piping under sink to be sure there is no leakage - ditto under diswhwasher. It only takes a very tiny leak to make a pretty loud noise - sometimes so small you cannot evenb see the spray, only able to detect it by a wet spot or puddle, or by running your hand near the pipe and feel the extremely fine vaporized mist coming out of a pinhole leak. That type of leak most common at connections, though can occur anywhere in the piping in metal pipe due to corrosion pitting forming a pinhole leak.
...
...
2) try adjusting the faucet valve(s) position a touch - especially with single-handle faucets, sometimes just a tiny movement up and down or to one side can shut off a tiny leak bypassing the seals. (Can also be a sign, if it happens often or repeatedly, that the gaskets/seals in the faucet are getting old and starting to leak). Commonly associated with a slow drip from the faucet.
...
...
3) sometimes the spray nozzle valve will leak just a touch, making a chattering or humming sound - exercise the handle on the spray nozzle if you have one and see if that affects it.
...
...
4) if your water pressure is running high (seems to be coming out of faucet faster/more forcefully than usual), then could be the local water pressure has been cranked up a bit because of New Years demand (common during Bowl games especially) or to compensate for a broken or leaking frozen pipe in the water system, or to increase pressure to firefighters fighting a major fire in your area. If on well, could also mean the pressure shutoff controller on the pump is not working right, so it is pressuring your system up to more than the normal 30-60 psi (assuming wellhead and house are at roughly same elevation).
...
...
5) a failing pressure regulator, if you house has one, can also cause humming or screeching or chatter at valves and faucets. For about $10-15 you can get a screw-on hose fitting pressure gauge (should read to 100 psi or more) which you can screw onto a hose bib or the drain valve on the water heater or laundry room faucet or such to check your indoor pressure. Generally, 35 some to 50 is considered a good pressure (static pressure - when no water is being used) to give you adequate operating pressure without over-stressing the system and appliances. Over 60 is discouraged, especially in older piping, and over 70 is in the trouble range where you can expect to start seeing possible failures or leaks.
...
...
6) if the sound occurs at ALL faucets, then an "instant hot water" circulating pump on the hot water piping, or a steam/hot water boiler circulating pump humming (which is not unusual nor, if not loud or screechy, necessarily a sign of a problem) is commonly the cause. Also a failing heat pump mounted on top of a high-efficiency water heater can do this.
...
...
7) ditto if occcurring at all hot faucets, a leaking overtemp/overpressure valve on the hot water heater (or boiler) can put a howl or hum through the pipes. Check the external drain pipe coming from the valve at the top-side of the water heater to see if water is dripping out of it. During overpressure events in the boiler/heater it can bleed off a bit of water causing a hum or screech - also as they get old they sometimes start bleeding just enough water to cause a sharp sound as a tiny amount of water gets past the seal.
...
...
8) some water softeners/filter systems have an audible alarm generated by water flow to tell you when the unit needs salt, or when the filter needs changing
...
...
9) if you have an under-sink filtration or distillation water pruification unit, check that is not the source of the noise - a service alarm, or a leak, etc.
...
...
10) if those do not track it down or stop it, then putting your ear to pipes or better yet, using a stethoscope (about $10 at pharmacy department in box store), tracking the sound along the pipes to where it is loudest can pin it down.
...
...
If these did not help you tie it down, then Plumbing is the Search the List category for you to use to find a well-rated and reviewed plumber to come check it out and fix it.

Answered 10 months ago by LCD

0
Votes

One thing I forgot to mention, since we (who should be in the depths of winter) are sitting here basking in 45 degree weather - if you have had unusually cold conditions you could have frozen pipes.


Check if you have free water flow from the faucets (both hot and cold) - and try running dishwasher too. If a pipe freezes up with the faucet closed, it can cause the expanding water (as it progressively freezes along the pipe) to squeeze past the seals and gaskets in the faucet - causing a high-pitched squeel or a humming, even though there may be very little water getting through - sometimes almost none as the water vaporizes as it gets past the seal, so the faucet may drip only very, very slowly if at all.

Answered 10 months ago by LCD




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