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Question DetailsAsked on 11/30/2015

who would I call to pick up for free cut tree pieces from ash tree

WE cut a down on Saturday. Some parts were 21 in diameter were to big for us to move to the dump. The tree is cut in about 6 parts. ash tree Free to anyone who wants to take it. The location is Milwaukee.

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Couple of possibilities, each with its own possible issues and risks:


1) if in an area with hardwood logging, a small independent logging company MIGHT be willing to pick them up for free - generally only if at least 8 feet long and preferably 12-16 feet long per piece, AND pretty straight. Which if 21" diameter means probably 60'+ tree, so I am guessing your lengths are probably 6-10 feet - not optimum for lumber production.


2) most firewood companies will pick up wood (especially hardwood) if enough to be worth their while - which if this is a 60' or so tree might be.


3) of course you can Craigslist it for free.


4) call a Tree Service to remove it - which they might do intact to sell for firewood or commercial wood (likely) or might chip to dispose of. Some who routinely cut down large hardwood trees and have an established relationship with a local mill sometimes give a discount for the wood value, many do not.


5) call a tow service with tiltbed tow truck to load them up and chain them down, then haul off and dispose of at local free woodlot (if any) or city dump - paying towing fee plus dump fee of course. Haulers (trash haulers) will do this too if not too big for them to load and if their truck/trailer can handle it. And be sure in advance WHERE you can dispose of it - many city dumps do NOT take wood - you HAVE to cut to certain maximum lengths and dispose of at a designated wood disposal area for people to come for reuse, or for chipping for mulch.


6) contact local woodworking club to see if any member wants for carving - ditto for chainsaw carvers in your area if generally over 4-5 feet long


7) contact local boy scout or church camp or similar organization to see if they will take away for campfire wood or seats at a campground


8) ask neighbors who you know garden/landscape or use their fireplace a lot if they want it as firewood or as garden/planter borders


9) my favorite, and least hassle if you can feasible do it (realizing ash will probably rot away in 15-20 years) is to cut to handleable size (or roll) and use for on-site garden or gravel walk borders (part buried or split), delineation "fence" along drive or property line or near edge of sidewalk (on your property, off of road easement), retaining wall, sandbox border, etc. OR cut to a size you can tilt/roll and use for a grouping of log seats or steps or planter retaining wall or kid play area, or scarf one side off and use as a bench or terrace. Or use logs as is, moved to a rectangle to make an enclosed planter or topsoil storage pile area or such - single-depth or two-layer lincoln logged with the smaller pieces. OR carve/burn/drill out logs to use AS planters. You can google a search phrase like - images for uses for logs in yard - for ideas for tons of on-property uses.


Now the potential issues -


10) having someone come on your property to remove the wood invokes homeowner liability and damasge risk - liability if they get hurt cutting or loading it, or even their vehicle getting hit because it is sticking out into the street.


11) Also, consider property damage potential - damage to any planters or plantings or such they might hit driving on the yard, lawn damage (rutting from tire loads especially if ground is wet when they come, turning/spinning tires on grass, dragging logs out with a tow strap), etc. Also possibility of driveway damage from driving of the edge of the paving - due to soft ground, large vehicle load, dragging trunk pieces across drive with tow strap, etc. Also possibility of damaging in-ground utilites - wiring, piping, drains, etc if buried shallow in your area so can crush or get punctured (espeically under commercial truck loads), or by spinning wheeels dig down to them.


12) Also whether you are going to require they take branches too, or clean up sawdust and bark pieces, especially if recutting in place - can leave quite a mess, though granted less for with ash than many species.


Basically speaking, if you don't PAY a contractor/vendor who is insured to take it, those risks are totally on you, so I recommend at a minimum cutting to handleable size and putting as close as legal to the street with a free sign, or preferably paying an insured contractor (firewood or tree removal service) to dispose of it. Certainly the MOST dangerous is having someone come and take it for free, cutting it up on your property - can you say throwing Tim Taylor (Home Improvement TV show by Tim Allen) and Murphy (of Murphy's Laws) together in one package deal ?

Answered 2 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

I live at an apartment and they are putting the trees in the garbage compactor. It is sad the see trees going in the garbage they can still be used.

Answered 16 days ago by Mistysweetrose




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