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Question DetailsAsked on 1/24/2014

Anyone with solar panel? Is the power stable enough for your electronic appliances and lighting?

please share your experience

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4 Answers

Voted Best Answer
2
Votes

Are you talking about powering your home solely on solar (i.e. no back up power source or off grid).


The power, once convered from DC to AC via the inverter, is suitable for use by the home.


Most solar application are in supplement to the current powering of the home and will spin the meter back in the day but are not the primary.

Answered 5 years ago by WoWHomeSolutions

0
Votes

interested to hear actual experience of using direct solar power during the day as the sun light is inconsistent. Asume the system will switch back and forth between solar and grid power.

-Would this affect the life span of electronic used in the home?

-Would the people notice anything like light flickering, equipment got turned off..etc?

Thank you

Answered 5 years ago by Guest_9087113

0
Votes

The inverters and switching mechanisms make the power seamless.


Should not have any impact on the devices and useability.

Answered 5 years ago by WoWHomeSolutions

1
Vote

Having been a member of design and installation teams for solar energy installations for numerous remote installations, both military and civilian, from half Kw to hundreds of MegaWatts, here are a few throughts for you:

1) between the sun and your load there are a number of devices - solar cells, the panels themselves, panel bus connectors, feed to your load center, inverter to convert DC to AC power, variable transformer to match the voltage to your household voltage, load following/phase locking circuitry to phase match the solar power to the power company sine wave phase - all of these can malfunction, break, etc - so you should NEVER count on clean power of correct voltage and amperage capacity for your devices.

2) when the household power load switches back and forth between solar and line power, you WILL get flickers and surges - usually not fatal, but commonly are enough at times to cause monitors and electronic systems to flicker, and electronic devices to drop out.

3) I have never seen a solar system where they did not specifically recommend protection on your electronic devices. Lights are pretty tolerant. Electrical devices like motors and heating devices are tolerant as long as the voltage and frequency stays in acceptable ranges. Electronic devices are commonly NOT tolerant.

4) The real problem which makes home solar systems more of a problem, is that they are linked to the public power system - so there are protections that have to be put in place that work against your functionality. First, they cannot backfeed the system if it is dead - so during public power outages you either have to have an automatic disconnect, or the system has to automatically shut down - without warning, of course. Also, because it has no prayer of "fighting" with the public power, any inability to match voltage or phase causes (or should cause) an automatic shutdown, commonly in milliseconds, so without time for automatic switching back to the public power system. So - don't ever assume it will work right all the time - it plain won't. Also, if it gets damaged or defective and does not catch that fact itself, you will not know about it until the problem is so bad that it either blows a breaker, or totally fails.

5) In commercial applications, supplemental solar power installations are commonly designed so low-sensitivity loads like geothermal heating, lighting, electrified security fences and resistive loads can run off the solar panels, but sensitive devices like electronics are frequently put on dedicated circuits that run only off line power.

6) So - long story short - ALWAYS protect your electronic devices with a UPPS (Uninterruptable Protective Power Supply) - basically backup battery including line protection against over and under voltage and surge and line fault protection. Can be a whole-house one costing thousands of $ that the solar system feeds into, or local ones connected to specific devices for $200-500 typically. For your use, since you are counting on line power cutting in as needed, your primary protection need will be against "dirty" power, plus enough battery power to provide for a deliberate shutdown if needed. In assessing battery needed, remember you may not be at the device when the UPPS indicates it is providing power from battery - so allow for time away on a phone call, bathroom break, someone at the door, walking the dog, etc in accounting for how long a time your devices have to be able to operate without outside power. Of course, having them on particular circuits can reduce the required capacity of a household UPPS, as you want to limit the load it carries to just the essential electronics you are trying to protect, not the 20-30Kw entire house load.

Answered 5 years ago by LCD

1
Vote

Having been a member of design and installation teams for solar energy installations for numerous remote installations, both military and civilian, from half Kw to hundreds of MegaWatts, here are a few throughts for you:

1) between the sun and your load there are a number of devices - solar cells, the panels themselves, panel bus connectors, feed to your load center, inverter to convert DC to AC power, variable transformer to match the voltage to your household voltage, load following/phase locking circuitry to phase match the solar power to the power company sine wave phase - all of these can malfunction, break, etc - so you should NEVER count on clean power of correct voltage and amperage capacity for your devices.

2) when the household power load switches back and forth between solar and line power, you WILL get flickers and surges - usually not fatal, but commonly are enough at times to cause monitors and electronic systems to flicker, and electronic devices to drop out.

3) I have never seen a solar system where they did not specifically recommend protection on your electronic devices. Lights are pretty tolerant. Electrical devices like motors and heating devices are tolerant as long as the voltage and frequency stays in acceptable ranges. Electronic devices are commonly NOT tolerant.

4) The real problem which makes home solar systems more of a problem, is that they are linked to the public power system - so there are protections that have to be put in place that work against your functionality. First, they cannot backfeed the system if it is dead - so during public power outages you either have to have an automatic disconnect, or the system has to automatically shut down - without warning, of course. Also, because it has no prayer of "fighting" with the public power, any inability to match voltage or phase causes (or should cause) an automatic shutdown, commonly in milliseconds, so without time for automatic switching back to the public power system. So - don't ever assume it will work right all the time - it plain won't. Also, if it gets damaged or defective and does not catch that fact itself, you will not know about it until the problem is so bad that it either blows a breaker, or totally fails.

5) In commercial applications, supplemental solar power installations are commonly designed so low-sensitivity loads like geothermal heating, lighting, electrified security fences and resistive loads can run off the solar panels, but sensitive devices like electronics are frequently put on dedicated circuits that run only off line power.

6) So - long story short - ALWAYS protect your electronic devices with a UPPS (Uninterruptable Protective Power Supply) - basically backup battery including line protection against over and under voltage and surge and line fault protection. Can be a whole-house one costing thousands of $ that the solar system feeds into, or local ones connected to specific devices for $200-500 typically. For your use, since you are counting on line power cutting in as needed, your primary protection need will be against "dirty" power, plus enough battery power to provide for a deliberate shutdown if needed. In assessing battery needed, remember you may not be at the device when the UPPS indicates it is providing power from battery - so allow for time away on a phone call, bathroom break, someone at the door, walking the dog, etc in accounting for how long a time your devices have to be able to operate without outside power. Of course, having them on particular circuits can reduce the required capacity of a household UPPS, as you want to limit the load it carries to just the essential electronics you are trying to protect, not the 20-30Kw entire house load.


Answered 5 years ago by LCD




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