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Question DetailsAsked on 4/25/2014

Are you supposed to haggle after you get a quote on work? In this case it's a masonry job for about $6,000.

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2 Answers

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I would say in my own case as a contractor no. I always give the best price I think I can do a job for. I have had customers ask and I am not offended by it but my answer is always the same. I say I can go over my estimate to check for errors and if I figured anything I would adjust it and it not I ask if there is something they don't really need I could refigure how much it could lower the price. It is possible with some of the larger companies with sales staff and other layers of costs that they may be able to do this or if you in an area where there is such a shortage of contractors they are able to pad the prices you might get a lower price by asking or if a contractor is really desparate for work.


Don

Answered 5 years ago by ContractorDon

1
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Assuming you got bids rom several contractors, you have already done the "haggling" in the marketplace - unless you question a specific cost item in his bid as being unreasonable, then the only "haggling" that is not likely to tic him off and make him walk away is with respect to progress payments, as in your other question.


If you think his bid is too high, then you can always go out for more bids. Just beware, cheaper is not necessarily better, especially with a skilled trade like masonry, I would gladly pay 25% more for an old-time experienced mason with thousands of jobs under his belt than a cheaper one with maybe 1 year experience as an apprentice - or none - who thinks he can set up and run an opeation himself.

Answered 5 years ago by LCD




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