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Question DetailsAsked on 9/25/2015

CAN I COLLECT MY NEIGHBOURS TREE LEAVES THAT FALL ON OUR PROPERTY AND DUMP THEM BACK ON HIS LAWN

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I suppose you might find a place where it is legal, but not likely - falling and wind-blown leaves and branches, overhanging branches, normal slope runoff of water (NOT if artifically concentrated by his drainage system), silt-sand-mud runoff and the occasional cobble or boulder weathering out of a normal NATURAL slope and rolling into your yard, etc are all considered act of god, and your responsibility to handle - and no, you cannot put back on his property without his permission.


Significant water runoff concentrations, mud flows, rolling rocks, etc from construction sites or man-made fills ARE his responsiblity to prevent, under both environmetnal laws and the premise that a person may not create a nuisance to the public or his neighbors.


Gray areas come in regarding how much certain drainage water concentration is natural and how much caused by him (i.e. runoff from a roof that would have otherwise soaked into the ground as rainfall), invasive plants like crabgrass or bamboo and dandelions and such that are not controlled by him or are planted by him, hazard trees on his side that threaten to fall and damage your property (especially if dead), hazard boulders in his slopes that threaten to erode out and roll onto your property, etc have all been ruled by different courts on both sides of the "fence" - so to speak.


I would suggest you mow them into your yard as mulch (unlaess you have a thatch problem already) or start a compost pile.

Answered 5 years ago by LCD




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