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Question DetailsAsked on 5/8/2014

Does anyone have experience with Jeld-wen replacement windows? I have found mixed reviews on the brand.

One of the companies I am working with to replace the original steel windows in my 1940 all brick colonial has suggested we use Jeld-wen aluminum clad wood. I am not sure how the compare to Pella, Andersen, Marvin or any other brand. Thoughts and experiences are approciated.

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6 Answers

Voted Best Answer
1
Vote

I used to specify them, but quit after too many seal failures on the multipane units. Also had trouble with units not coming in square, so they had to be forced back square with shims to avoid jamming and binding of moving units. I would recommend Pella or Anderson over Jeld-wen - no opinion on Marvin, have not seen much of them in our area.

Answered 6 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

If your looking for high performance insulation and energy saving we found okna windows to be a top performance product with very reasonable prices. for a free estimate in the New York metro area you can call 718-863-5278.

Answered 6 years ago by the new window man

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I priced Anderson and I could not afford them. They were 25k for 18 windows. Pella is slightly out of budget but could be doable.


The Jeld-wen is the the Traditional Plus Wood double hung with aluminum clad. Pella would be their Proline offering.


I have read both good an bad things about both brands.

Answered 6 years ago by Guest_9624673

1
Vote

Unfortunately, you will find a significant percentage of almost any brand these days is defective - I figure about 10-15% of new items purchased are factory defective or have such severe design flaws as to make them useless.


Windows tend to be a case in point - between sloppy workmanship or drug use or drunkeness or just plain couldnot care less attitude by some plant workers, then rough handling in shipment, rough handling by installers, failure of installers to follow installation instructions, installation upside down or inside out, etc - it is amazing the number of defective installations is not greater.

Answered 6 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

That is one of my main concerns. Unfortunately I don't really have a choice to replace. The windows are orginal steel and leak a lot of air. They are a pain to open and close.


If I could keep the original windows I would. I did reach out to a restoration company but they are so swamped and don't have to time. I am not even sure restoration would make them all that much better.

Answered 6 years ago by Guest_9624673

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Votes

I would suspect the issue is dirt buildup, and maybe a bit of settlement, plus seals gone out.


Normally, a good cleaning of the track and sliding areas with Dawn, followed by a wiping on of WD40 (NOT sprayed on, can bleed through cracks and stain paint) will ease opening issues. Wipe the WD40 wetted cloth along the mating surfaces and tracks/slides until it comes clean - commonly takes several passes with a clean oiled rag. Do NOT use paper towels - leaves too much paper debris in the track. Oil operator rods and gears and pivot pins and wheels too.


IF after the cleaning some still bind, then a window installer can come and remove the inside trim, and cut out and adjust the shims that hold the window in place in the rough opening, squaring the window back up so it fits right - can commonly be done for small adjustments without even removing the exterior trim.


Most windows the seals can be replaced - Home Depot and Lowes have extensive selections of replacement seal strips, which usually slip into grooves or slots in the frame, though some are stapled or glued on. Should also use non-expanding foam to seal around frames whiletrim strip is off - usually a large portion of your window air leakage is actually around the outside of the frame rather than through the window unit itself.


Professional cleaning and seal replacement probably about $50/window if doing a number of them at same time, adjustment another $50-100 each - so even on those needing adjustment, total cost comes to about half the cost of a new window on those needing adjustment of the frame, and maybe 1/10-1/8 the cost if you do the cleaning and weatherstripping yourself.


Of course, newer windows would be much more energy efficient.

Answered 6 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

Take a look at OKNA www.oknawindows.com

Answered 6 years ago by the new window man




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