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Question DetailsAsked on 5/20/2014

HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR A COMPANY TO BE BONDED IF THEY ARE GOING TO DO EXTENSIVE WORK ON A KITCHEN?

We need a company we can trust to do the work, on time, and correctly. We have a specific budget and won't have any room for last minute--"oh, we need to do this and it will cost you more"

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How important would it be to you if they goeper absconding with the company's money, etc. Or if they changed management part way through or got bought out by Sam's Used Cars, Remodeling and Marijuana Enterprises, Inc, operated out of Joe's Bar and Grill - hours 4PM to closing time ? Without bonding, you have no legal assurance of adequacy or completion of the work, and with the normal job and contractor suing is not worth the cost to you in legal fees, plus the normal contractor might not be worth what you are suing for anyway - particularly if his failure to complete or poor work is causing his business to fail, or if he is a scammer ?


here is an AL article on the subject too -


http://www.angieslist.com/contractor/...


You need your contract to contain firm pricing, firm scope of work, definitive schedule with intermediate measurement and payment points and payment schedule, a statement that timely completion is essential to the contract - and insurance and bonding, in addition to really good reviews INCLUDING a record of timely and on-budget completion. Oh - and you should have a 20% contingency fund (unknown to him, of course) to cover unexpected conditions and contingencies, meaning with limited funds only budget (and contract) for use of 83% of the available money - then if you are getting to the end of the job and have committments from him for total project cost, then you can talk about minor change orders for an additional bells or whistles thing here or there as add-ons (without changing completed scope of work, of course). Expecting zero change orders is unrealistic on n "extensive" kitchen remodel, to put it simply.

Answered 5 years ago by LCD




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