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Question DetailsAsked on 9/13/2014

How do I regulate the water in my toilet bowl

The water in my toilet comes almost to the top of the bowl, afraid it's going to overflow. How do I regulate this?

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6 Answers

0
Votes

If the water level is rising unusually high in the bowl when flushing, you have a partial blockage, probably in the gooseneck portion of the bowl (the "siphon"), which is commonly visible on the outside of the bowl as a swan or gooseneck bulb on both sides of the toilet bowl/base. Using the toilet in this condition willl commonly rapidly result in a near total clog, as more material piles up behindthe clog, so you need to cler it out asap.


Here is a simplified article on how a toilet and the siphon works, FYI -


http://home.howstuffworks.com/toilet.htm


Commonly it is a paper clog, and just pouring a few buckets of full-hot water out of the bathtub will break it up and wash it away - just be careful not to pour so fast you overflow it, but if you keepthe water level high in the bowl as you pour it will put more flow through the siphon, clearing the clog faster. Rarely takes more than 2 bucket fulls if there is a noticeable amount of water flowing out of the toilet - obviously does not work if it is not at least partly draining.


if that does not work, you could try surging the water in the outlet of the bowl with a toilet plunger - usually will dislodge what is blocking the flow unless it is something that shouldnot have gone down there - like a toy, cap from a can of something, feminine hygience product, etc. When you use the plunger, slowly push down to get the air out of it, then pull back sharply to create a suction in the toilet drain passage. Works much better than pushing down hard, as that just usually pushes whatever is stuck tighter into the bowl.


Otherwise, needs to be snaked - you can do yourself with a water closet snake (has protective rubber on it to prevent scratching the bowl ceramic - also known as toilet auger or closet auger), or have Plumber or Sewer and Drain contractor come and do it for typically around $75-150 depending on local labor costs. Sewer and Drain contractor commonly cheaper but not all do simple toilet clogs - some only do in-pipe clogs.



Answered 5 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

I should have mentioned in my prior response that the toilet is designed so the tank empties at a certain flow rate at full tank level, basically that which the normal outflow rate is - so there is no need to be able to regulate the inflow to the bowl, and if you did so it would decrease the scouring and flushing power of the toilet and degrade its ability to clear the bowl.


There is no way more water than normal can come down from the tank to the bowl, so any rise of bowl water level above the normal is due to a blockage in the outlet sipohon of the toilet or the drain pipe below it - almost always in the toilet passage itself because that is much more convoluted and a smaller diameter than the drain pipes below it.

Answered 5 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

I should have mentioned in my prior response that the toilet is designed so the tank empties at a certain flow rate at full tank level, basically that which the normal bowl outflow rate is - so there is no need to be able to regulate the inflow to the bowl, and if you did so it would decrease the scouring and flushing power of the toilet and degrade its ability to clear the bowl.


There is no way more water than normal can come down from the tank to the bowl, so any rise of bowl water level above the normal is due to a blockage in the outlet sipohon of the toilet or the drain pipe below it - almost always in the toilet passage itself because that is much more convoluted and a smaller diameter than the drain pipes below it.

Answered 5 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

I am assuming that the water is entering the tank after a flush. So to control the level of the water you can do the following. If you have a ball valve and float you bend the arm attached to the ball float which will close the fill valve earlier. If you have the type that has a black plastic float which rises up and down on a plastic pipe there are two ways to adjust the level in this type of fill valve depending on the model. One, if there is a metal clip visible on float, You just squeeze the clip and move the arm and clip down that will shut off the fill water earlier. Two, if there is screw driver slot on fill arm, insert a small screw driver or a dime and rotate counter clockwise this will result in the fill valve shutting off sooner so there will be less water in the tank. In all cases you have keep adjusting until the water reaches the correct fill level in the tank. Good luck. Harmony Herb

Answered 3 years ago by harmonyherb

0
Votes

Note that the measures HarmonyHerb described so well act to reduce the amount of water stored in the tank - less water in the tank, less bowl filling. All good and well, and can eliminate bowl overfilling but not the preferred solution.


But, if the bowl is not able to flush with a full tank it still means you have a flow restriction in the gooseneck in the toilet base, or in the drain pipes that should be snaked out with a closet snake (a type of sewer snake with protective sleeve to prevent marring the inside of the toilet bowl and syphon - the inlet into the gooseneck), because it is very likely to become more and more retricted as time goes on. The toilet should be able to flush fine without overflowing (if a normal rather than exotic ultra-low flow design) weith a completely full tank, to the top of the overflow tube. Might be a physical item caught in the system, or a buildup of material over time - either caught on protrusions or rough spots, possibly mineral or biologic growth buildup, or both.

Answered 3 years ago by LCD

0
Votes

I am affraid I misunderstood your problem. I thought the water was rising to high in the water tank, but after further reading it is the actual toilet boil that you fear might overflow and in that case all the suggestions regarding possible blockage are correct. Sorry for my misunderstanding. Harmonyherb

Answered 3 years ago by harmonyherb




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