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Question DetailsAsked on 9/5/2013

How much does it cost to replace all ductwork in town home?

I have mold in all of my ducts and most are flex ducts. I live in Southern New Jersey and home is approximately 2000 sq ft (town home). Most places are telling me I will need to tear out significant amount of drywall to get to the duct work for it to be replaced. I also need some help finding the cause of the mold issue in the ductwork. Thank you.

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5 Answers

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1
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Here is an answer to a prior question you might find useful -

https://answers.angieslist.com/how-co...

I would say your priorities are backwards - solve the moisture problem source FIRST, otherwise you new or newly cleaned ducts will mold too. The ducts are NOT the problem - the moisture is.

You need a full HVAC system airflow and air quality analysis to find the problem, which could be a simple as a plugged drain line on the evaporator or excessive household humidity from damp basement or crawlspace to a mis-match of airflows and A/C temperature.

As far as changing out ducts, unless there is a large buildup of mold, a chemical treatment to kill it and a brush cleaning with HEPA filter vacuum on the suction side followed by a mildewcide treatment should clean them out at about 1/10th the cost of new ducts, or less. There is a lot of mold spores in the air - so they do not have to be absolutely mold-free, you just have to get rid of the moisture that is causing it to thrive.

Answered 6 years ago by LCD

1
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Agree- You must fix the mold problem first- The HVAC contractors in typical fashion have it backwards. Find someone who is more interested in fixing the mold problem than selling you uneeded work. Some of the causes are mentioned with the evaporator "A" coil in the air handler dripping condensate into a drain pan which the pumps out the water. Running with out a filter or excessive dirt will cause dust to collect on the coil fins which can be easily cleaned.

I would recommend spending a few dollars on a NJ utility/state sponsored energy audit which generally includes a complete duct airflow check and duct pressurization for duct air leaks. A return air duct disconnect/leak could be pulling in damp air from outside the living area. The energy auditor is trained/certified to find mold issues and energy issues.

Answered 6 years ago by hosey

0
Votes

OP here. Thanks for the info guys. That makes complete sense to find the casue first then address the mold issue. Does anyone know of any good NJ utility/state sponsored energy audit companies? I live in Wildwood NJ. I guess I can just google those words and look for one? Thanks again - JP

Answered 6 years ago by Xopenex

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Here is a link explaining the process and names of the sponsored audit companies - follow links from there as needed-

http://www.njcleanenergy.com/commerci...

Answered 6 years ago by LCD

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You want to use a auditor/contractor who is BPI certified. For a list of auditors in NJ go to:

www.BPI.org


Answered 6 years ago by hosey

0
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To get the New Jersey subsidized audit at the reduced cost and be eligible for the follow-on energy savings improvements rebates, not just any BPI auditor will work - you have to use one of the 5 or 6 companies contracted with the state (for as long as the program lasts) at the wesite I gave previously - njcleanenergy.com

Answered 6 years ago by LCD




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