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Question DetailsAsked on 8/10/2015

I mowed my lawn and my mower had a rust colored dust all over it after. What would cause this?

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2 Answers

0
Votes

It is a disease called rust. It is usually only found on lawns in the fall and is considered a cosmetic disease. Meaning that it seldom will cause damage to the turf.


Continue to mow as normal and apply fertilizer to help promote growth and color improvment.



Source: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/timing_f...

Answered 2 years ago by rwar515

0
Votes

For rust colored the prior answer about rust disease is likely right. While lawn rust fungal growth is not considered particularly harmful to the lawn, especially sinceit usually shows up in the late part of the growing season, it is indicative of weakened or stressed lawn - it does not thrive on health lawn - so google some Cooperative Extension or state ag service websites for diagnosis and treatment to make your lawn healthier, or if you area is particularly prone to it, maybe overseeding with a grass variety that is not so susceptible to it.


Other causes for a colored dust all over the mower - heavy tree pollen on the lawn, mowing leaves that are fully dead and dried so basically turn to dust when mowed, mowing over bare dirt or through grass that had a lot of road dust/dirt washed/swept onto it, mowing piles of leaves putting leaf dust in the air around the mower, mowing large amount of fungal growth (toadstools,mushrooms, etc) which are dry so they turn to dust or powder when mowed - puffball types especially. Most of these make a white, tan, or brown dust through - except in red clay country road dirt or base dirt mowing would certainly do it.

Answered 2 years ago by LCD




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