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Question DetailsAsked on 3/10/2015

I have purchased a house that has a two car garage and we need a third garage.

We would like to find someone that would build it attached to current structure. I'm only asking for three walls, brick to match house on the three walls, regular size single car garage door, one exit door on side or rear. Concrete floor, and roof . NO DRYWALL inside we will finish everything else. Most likely the garage would be 12 X 20. Oh would need a concrete apron by front garage door. Can't find anyone to build this for me.

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Your Search the List category is Builders - Garages, Barns, Sheds


One recommendation - an addition like this will almost always settle a bit in the first few years - commonly 1/4-1 inch unless compaction is poorly done, in which case it can reach 2-4 inches - causing buckling or wrinkling of roofing, siding, etc - so I always recommend making aflexible interface between the two structures - step the roofing a bit soit doesnot have to bridge over a settled surface, stop the siding atthe joint and cover the interface with a trim strip, use labor thru bolts to connect framing to the existing house, but with slotted holes to allow settlement without hanging up, put a construction joint at the interface in any concrete, provide a bit of slack at the interface in any utilities, etc. Simple to do if in the original plans, and avoids unsightly and potentially water-intrusion issues down the road, which can also affect resale value.

Answered 4 years ago by LCD




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