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Question DetailsAsked on 6/5/2015

IS YOUR PLUMBING FOR BATHROOMS AND KITCHEN ALL SUPPOSE TO GO INTO A 4" DRAIN OR ARE THE TOILETS SEPERATE?

I HAVE 2 BATH AND KITCHEN AND ALL THE DRAINS RUN INTO ONE MAIN RUN INTO THE SAME PIPE TO GO OUT TO THE SEPTIC. NOT ALWAYS BUT SOME TIME YOU CAN HEAR THE TOILET GIRGLE WHEN YOU FLUSH. SHOULD THE TOILETS BE ON ONE DRAIN PIPE AND ALL THE OTHER DRAINS ON ANOTHER. AND Y TOGETHER BEFORE THEY GO OUT TO THE SEPTIC?

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All consumptive uses will almost always branch into one single (generally 4" but sometimes 3 or 6") drain pipe, called the main stack, which then goes underground to the septic system or sewer. Plumbing configuration depends on house layout, but commonly each bathroom (or pair if back-to-back) picks up all its sources in a 3 (or 4 inch if serves multiple toilet or bathrooms) branch line which then goes into the stack, and kitchen and washer commonly have their own branch(es) which go into the stack at some point - but eventually they all go into one or more stacks (multiple in larger homes and multi-family buildings) which then in almost all cases except where there are grade/slope issues, feed to one main line to street or sewer. Best practice would not put washer or kitchen on a toilet branch, but commonly done and legal in pretty much all areas as far as I know.


In some much older septic systems (generally outlawed now except in some rural areas) and a few newer ones in relatively impermeable soil, the "gray water" (basins and washing machine and showers/tubs and floor drains) goes to surface spreading and infiltration (or tree irrigation) or to a wet well to soak into the ground, with only the "black water" - toilets and usually dishwasher and kitchen sink, going to the septic system to reduce the amount of water it has to handle.


If OTHER toilets or drains gurgle when one is flushed, then that is usually a sign of partial blockage in the stack or main drain out of house and it needs to be cleaned out, or occasionally if has always happened can be due to improper venting, Many prior questions with responses about gurgling drains and cleaning sewer line in the Home > Plumbing link in Browse Projects, at lower left.


If the one gurgling is the one being flushed, as long as it goes down at normal rate without backing up that is probably just air in the system coming out into the bowl when you flush - some toilet brands do that more than others. VERY rarely that is a sound of a leaking wax seal under the toilet, but you should be getting visible leakage around the toilet/floor or on underlying level ceiling if that is the case. IF during normal flushing (NOT holding the handle down to fully empty the tank, but doing it own thing as designed) if at the end of the flush it pulls all the water out of the bowl and chug-a-chugs or gurgles as it pulls air in from the bowl before finally refilling with the trickle of water coming into the toilet, that can sometimes be poor toilet design, sometimes failure of the vent pipe to let enough air in to stop it from pulling all the water out of the trap water at the outlet of the bowl. IF it has always done this AND you are not getting gurgling noises in other drains (especially ones in same room) probably poor toilet design.


If a new thing or getting gurgling at other drains which is pulling the water out of the trap, then could be a blocked vent pipe that needs to be flushed out (usually from the roof) or snaked. If gurgling at other drains which could be backing-up of the liquid in the line, indication of partial blockage in the line and heading towards overflow into the lowest drain in the blocked line - commonly occurs first at lowest elevation floor drain or tub/shower drain lacking floor drains, though if you have the rare blockage in the stack (rare because it runs mostly vertical so rarely plugs up) can occur at any drain.


Overfull septic tank can also cause backups resulting in gurgling in lower drains as the water going down the drain forces the air in the drain pipes back out the lowest elevation drains or sometimes those with the shallowest U-trap - commonly tubs and showers.


Plumber can sometimes solve this problem, but not all have pipe clearing equipment capable of reaching to the septic tank/street so I would recommend a Sewer and Drain Cleaning contractor - and I recommend as long as you have him out there, if the main drain pipes have not been cleaned in the last 10 years or so, to have him full-diameter rout out the lines to the septic tank or street, as applicable, to remove the built up grease and sludge that reduces the line diameter and causes blockages. I prefer mechanical full-diameter scrapers - or if jetting is used (which is also better for clay and asbestos or asphaltic pipe and deteriorated metal drain lines) I recommend only ones with onboard camera so as he pulls back after cleanign you can confirm there are not skips, which are common with many jetting systems.

Answered 3 years ago by LCD




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