Ask Your Question

Angie's List Answers is the trusted spot to ask home improvement and health questions and get answers from service companies, health providers and consumers. For ratings and reviews on companies in your area, search Angie's List.

 
 
or
Submit
Top 30 Days Experts
Rank Leader Points*
1 kstreett 240
2 Guest_9020487 110
3 Guest_9190926 105
4 GoldenKid 100
5 mygfcxx1 95
6 ahowell 95
7 KnowledgeBase 95
8 skbloom 80
9 Guest_98024861 70
10 Guest_9311297 70

*Updates every 4 hours

Browse Projects By Category

Question DetailsAsked on 11/26/2019

Mold in AC coil, should I have ducts cleaned or at least checked?

We turned on our AC after not using it for a couple of days due to nice weather. We went to turn it on and this horrible stench came through the vents like dirty socks or rotten cheese. Soon after we started with head aches and sinus issues. We had our property manager send someone to check it out and we had mold on the coil. There was also a break in a seal for the unit so it was sucking in air from the attic. It was cleaned and replaced and the repair guy mentioned that being there was mold on the coil, we should get the ducts checked because mold most likely got in there even though he couldn’t see anything from where he was (they don’t do duct cleaning so he wasn’t trying to sell it to me). After the repair we still have the horrible smell and same health issues. Our property manager is acting like we are crazy and isn’t helping. I would like to know if it’s standard or recommended to get ducts looked out or cleaned after that type of repair?

Do you have the same question? Follow this Question


1 Answer

0
Votes

Google "dirty socks syndrone" since you mentioned the smell is like that, has nothing to do with mold in ducts, and is common, difficult to cure. Dirty socks usually happens when switching from cooling to heating, and vice versa, then usually goes away.


Air sample testing for mold is the best practice, as it quantifies what is in the air. Understand that mold, in humid climates is in the outdoor air in high quantities, so it will be in the home to some degree.


Source: dave@bayareacool.com

Answered 19 days ago by hvacman




Related Questions


Terms Of Use
|
Privacy Policy