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Question DetailsAsked on 3/5/2015

VERY STRONG SMELL COMING OUT OF MY SEWER VENT PIPE

I JUST HAD A NEW SEPTIC AND LETCH FIELD PUT IN AND THE PITCH ON MY SEPTIC IS 1/8 BUBBLE OFF ALSO ALL MY SEWER LINES ARE LEVEL NOW, AND I HAVE A VERY STRONG SMELL COMING OUT MY VENT PIPE.

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Smells like backup in the sewer pipes.


I would say you need a residential / construction contracts attorney ASAP - because it should not have been built that way and is likely to cause serious problems for the life of the field. Document what you know and talk to an attorney, who will likely recommend bringing in a Civil Engineer who is experienced in septic system design and inspection to do an assessment and expert witness report on its as-built condition versus what is should be like. I have seen several brand new septic systems torn back out immediately after construction for this sort of issue.


Unfortunately, if you knew about the sewer or leach field being level or reverse sloped before it was buried, you may have a tough time recovering from the contractor or his bonding company, under the theory of implied consent, which says that (as the owner) if you see things being done and know specific facts about them at the time and do not complain when you have the chance, it can consistute implied consent to the way it was done. Whether you should have recognized, considering your background and experience, that something was wrong plays a large part of that issue - hence needing an attorney right off.


In most jurisdictions, the installation should have been inspected and approved by a civil engineer BEFORE backfilling of the tank and pipes, and/or a governmnet inspection - was that done ? Also, was a septic system permit pulled by the contractor if required in your area (is required essentially everywhere due to federal clean water and aquifer preservation regulations) - if not, could weigh heavily in your favor.

Answered 4 years ago by LCD




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