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Question DetailsAsked on 3/16/2014

WHAT IS THE BEST WATER FILTRATION SYSTEM ON THE MARKET FOR WELL WATER?

I LIVE IN THE COUNTRY, I AM GETTING WATER FROM MY WATER WELL. I WAS WONDERING IF ANYONE HAD A WATER FILTRATION SYSTEM PUT IN. I NEED SOME CONSUMER ADVISE PLEASE.

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2 Answers

2
Votes

Have you done lab testing on the water?


In order to have the best recommendations on the system, you should first figure out what is in the water and design the system around that.



Answered 5 years ago by WoWHomeSolutions

1
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Like the other comment said - what you need depends on what you are trying to treat for. There are 7 basic types of treatment:


1) Filtration - removes suspended and a small portion of dissolved solids like silt and sand and iron algae and bacteria, usually by running through a sand filtration bed if heavy, or through disposable filters if just a bit of suspended sediment. IF you have a lot of suspended sediment in your water, that may be indicative of a screen problem in the well like a separated or rusted through screen.


2) Chemical treatment, like with a conventional water softener, to remove minerals and iron/sulfide bacteria from the water that cause hard water and buildup in pipes


3) Electrochemical Treatment, usually used to treat heavy levels of iron and sulfides in the water that cause pipe buildup and discolored water - usually by adding a resin and/or oxygenation or chlorine stage to a water softener system


4) Organics removal, with charcoal filtration and/or reverse osmosis usually, to remove organic contaminants, petroleum products, industrial or agricultural chemical contaminants, etc


5) Disinfection, usually with chlorine or ozone treatment, to disinfect bacterial contaminants - usually fecal coliform from adjacent leach fields or groundwater contaminated with surface water


6) High-Efficiency Odor/Taste removal to remove trace organics taste or color - usually done by combining one or more of above with final reverse osmosis treatment - commonly found in oil and coal country where persistent chemical color or taste makes it through conventional treatment systems. Also used where specific chemicals have contaminated the groundwater, like from industry or storage tank spills.


7) Radionuclide removal - to remove radioactive particles from the water, generally only used in parts of the Rocky Mountains and in the uraniumm producing areas of west Texas/New Mexico/Arizona/Colorado/Wyoming where natural uranium and other nuclear elements occur in high concentrations in sandstones or shales. Unusual to need this.


You need to evaluate, with water testing from a reputable water quality lab, what you are going to want to try to remove, then research a bit on what process is likely to work for you in your locale. State Geological Surveys and local water districts have lots of data on the general water quality from different aquifers, so if you know what depth(s) your well pulls water from, they should be able to help a lot. Your local public health department may also have data on what the common issues are in your area. Your well service company can also provide input on what usually works for their clients. Discussions with neighbors drawing on the same aquifer will be one of your best sources - both for what produces adequate water for them, and also with respect to cost and getting a provider who is not goingto try to sell you a bill of goods, or provide an inadequate system.


You can also get some ideas from reviewing prior comments in the Home > Water Treatment category in Browse Projects, at lower left this page.


I wish I could be more help, but each case is unique, so there is no cure-all at a reasonable price - each case has to be addressed individually to handle the particular types of issues your case presents.

Answered 5 years ago by LCD




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