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Question DetailsAsked on 10/26/2015

What would it cost to add a slop sink to a room in an old house.I am an artist.

The house has been renovated about 10 years ago. I am an artist and would like to have a slop sink in a studio room. There is a fairly new bathroom across the hall.

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Obviously depends on how easy the access to your existing piping is - though regardless of whether the floor joists run in the favorable direction for running piping to this sink, it is almost certainly going to mean cutting into the underlying ceiling (or the floor, though tht is usually much more destructive) at both the bathroom and this spot to do the hookup - this assumes you are on an upper floor of a frame building, not on ground slab or concrete/steel flooring. Water should not be at all tough because if crosswise to the structure could be done with pex - but crossways to the floor joists does make installing drain pipe a bit tougher - not impossible especially with plastic sewer pipe, just a bit more time consuming, so a bit more expensive.


Below is a link to a prior similar question with some similar issues and rough nubmers - obviously you will need to get a couple of plumber bids to see what your actual conditions cost will be - and if on a concrete slab of course you might be talking cutting through 10 feet or so of slab (and its overlying flooring if not removable carpet) so in that case, or if you have fancy ceiling underneath (or don't own the underlying unit) then gets quite difficult to do all from above - doable, but means a bunch of new flooring possibly.


https://answers.angieslist.com/How-co...

Answered 3 years ago by LCD




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