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Question DetailsAsked on 10/5/2014

is it ok to apply wood hardener to bare exposed wood, then prime and paint over it?

in other words, there's currently not a hole that needs wood hardener then filler. just wood that's been exposed to elements for a few weeks bc handyman left work unfinished, bare wood exposed to elements for a few weeks, and i'm afraid the wood is absorbing moisture and softening.

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I presume you are talking trim or siding where wter runs right off and does not stand on the surface, because I would hate to think you are using primer and paint on a wood deck or porch. If so, see last paragraph in this response I just did on another matter about paints and sealers outdoors -
https://answers.angieslist.com/Should... Certainly it needs to be thoroughly dry before priming and painting, which may mean covering it with visqueen or a tarp or whatever if you have rainy conditions this time of year. A few weeks weathering should not have caused noticeable damage - I would just let it dry thoroughly and then touch sand it (probably about 60 grit sandpaper for construction grade wood and normal window/door trim, maybe 100-140 for fine wood) to smooth out any raised grain from the wetting, then drive on with priming and painting. Be careful with the sanding about rounding corners if this is a trim with defined sharp detail, and always sand with the grain at all times when doing this. I don't know the hardener will "hurt" assuming the primer is compatible with it chemically, but I don't liketo use prodcuts like that unless absolutely necessary (aside from expense) because they leave a shiny, glossy surface that finishes do not stick to as well.

Answered 6 years ago by LCD




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